Norfolk: Spotlight on Natural Flood Management

first_imgWork is underway on the first of five natural flood management schemes along rivers in Norfolk to help manage flood risk to local properties and improve habitats, the Environment Agency said in its latest post. Natural flood management helps store flood water upstream and slows the flow of water along river channels, complementing the use of more traditional hard engineering downstream such as flood walls and embankments.The first two schemes under construction in Norfolk are on Camping Beck in the Bure Catchment at Buxton, and the River Yare at Marlingford.The Buxton project is being carried out through a partnership between the Norfolk Rivers Internal Drainage Board, the Broadland Catchment Partnership and the Environment Agency.This work will involve storing flood flows upstream of Buxton village in an area that will enhance the environment through providing habitat, whilst helping to reduce flood risk downstream.The Marlingford scheme is being carried out by a partnership involving Natural England, the Broadland Catchment Partnership and Environment Agency.A series of ‘flow deflectors’ and lengths of woody debris will be constructed in the channel of the River Yare to redirect flood water on to the flood plain, so it is stored upstream for longer and reduces the risk to communities downstream.Sections of the riverbank will also be lowered at strategic locations for the same reason, and ‘scrapes’ will be dug in to the floodplain to increase water storage capacity.last_img read more

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Natural Wonders Can Be Useful

first_imgTo find great ideas, look to nature.  Many plants and animals are as useful as they are ornamental.  They can show the way to solve problems of great interest to humans.Mussel power:  Want an abrasion-resistant, highly-extensible coating?  PhysOrg reported that mussels are providing inspiration to materials scientists.  They build a byssus, or network of threads, that attaches to hard surfaces and absorbs the energy of crashing waves.  A cuticle on the outer surfaces of these stretchy, flexible fibers is “a biological polymer, which exhibits epoxy-like hardness, while straining up to 100% without cracking.”  The cuticle’s success depends on its careful tailoring of protein-metal chemistry and organization of cross-links at the submicron level.  All human inventors need to do is study and copy what the mussel has achieved.  “Nature has evolved an elegant solution to a problem that engineers are still struggling with; namely, how to combine the properties of abrasion resistance and high extensibility in the same material,” said Peter Fratzl, director of the biomaterials department at the Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces.  “Conceivably, this same strategy could be applied in engineered polymers and composites.”  ScienceNow has a close-up picture of the mussel fibers.Insect glue:  The caddis fly is well known to fishermen.  They are accustomed to hunting for the tube-shaped larva shelters, made of grains of sand and rock.  The larva glues those grains together with silk made of a wet adhesive that is attracting the attention of inventors.  Science Daily reported on research into the characteristics of this glue.  It could be extremely useful to invent a glue that works when wet.  Imagine trying to put on a bandage in a shower.  Surgeons often have to attach sutures to wet biological tissue.    Scientists have found that the caddis fly can work its magic with glass beads replacing sand.  The silk, they found, resembles tape more than anything else.  It fastens the beads together from the inside.  They are studying this mechanism “for the purpose of trying to copy it,” the article said.  The material properties of the silk that allow it to work underwater have something to do with the way electrical charges are arranged on the molecules.    The article ended by speculating about how these abilities evolved.  The ability to make underwater adhesives has been identified in four phyla – members of which include caddis flies, sandcastle worms, mussels and sea cucumbers.  What does that mean?  To Russell Stewart (U of Utah) it can only mean one thing: “They came to this underwater adhesion solution completely independently,” he said.  The press release added, “showing that it repeatedly evolved because of its value in helping the creatures live and thrive, Stewart says.”Sea squirt lab rat:  Science Daily said that hope for those suffering from Alzheimer’s disease may come from the lowly sea squirt.  Scientists have found that they produce the tangles and plaques characteristic of Alzheimer’s quickly.  This makes them suitable as a model organism on which new drugs can be tested in a shorter time.  The article said, for whatever it means, “as long ago as Darwin, it has been recognized that sea squirts may be our closest invertebrate relatives; in their immature, tadpole form, they resemble proper vertebrates, and they share about 80% of their genes with us.”  But does this imply we are 80% sea squirt, or 60% banana?Bee silk for aviation:  Science Daily reported on progress to imitate bee silk.  Maybe you didn’t realize that bees make silk.  Maybe you also didn’t realize that silk is useful.  Indeed they do, and indeed it is: “Possible practical uses for these silks would be tough, lightweight textiles, high-strength applications such as advanced composites for use in aviation and marine environments, and medical applications such as sutures, artificial tendons and ligaments.”  A team in Australia is working on recombining the ingredients by producing them with the genes of other organisms, so that silk fibers can be hand-drawn without the need for the bee’s silk-producing glands.  Those glands are probably as hard to work with as bee’s knees.Pitcher plant medicine:  Some day, your cabinet may not just have pitchers, but medicines inspired by the pitcher plant.  Researchers at Tel Aviv University are producing anti-fungal drugs, said Science Daily, based on the carnivorous plant’s technology.  Pitcher plants need more than just the ability to digest animal products to gain carbon and nitrogen from poor soils; “Carnivorous plants also possess a highly developed set of compounds and secondary metabolites to aid in their survival.”  It’s in those compounds, produced in special glands by the plant, where anti-fungal medicines are waiting to be discovered.    The plant has to protect itself from fungi that would steal its meal.  “To avoid sharing precious food resources with other micro-organisms such as fungi, the carnivorous plant has developed a host of agents that act as natural anti-fungal agents,” said Prof. Aviah Zilberstein of the university.  Some of these compounds, if isolated for medicine, “may avoid the evolution of new resistant infective strains.”  Secondary infections from fungi are a serious problem in hospitals.  “There is a lot of room for developing compounds from nature into new drugs,” Zilberstein said.  “The one we are working on is not toxic to humans.  Now we hope to show how this very natural product can be further developed as a means to overcome some basic problems in hospitals all over the world.”  The article noted that drinking pitcher plant liquid as an elixir has been documented in the folk medicine of India.Green fertilizer:  Nitrogen is a tough nut to crack.  The triple bonds of N2 gas usually require high amounts of energy, like lightning or the Haber process, to pull apart so that ammonia and other compounds can be produced (this is called “fixing” nitrogen).  Somehow, nitrogenase enzymes in bacteria that live in nodules attached to the roots of some plants do it with ease at room temperature.  “It sounds simple, but it is a complicated and poorly understood process,” the article said.    For thousands of years, farmers have known that legumes (including peas, beans, alfalfa and clover) can increase productivity of fallow ground when alternated with other crops.  That’s a major reason George Washington Carver urged southern farmers, whose fields were being depleted by cotton and boll weevil infestations, to grow peanuts.  Until recently, no one understood why legumes were so effective in boosting the productivity of the soil.  Science Daily reported on a discovery at Stanford that helps explain their potential.  The finding might reduce fertilizer use and help the environment.  “We have discovered a new biological process, by which leguminous plants control behavior of symbiotic bacteria,” said Stanford molecular biologist Sharon Long.  “These plants have a specialized protein processing system that generates specific protein signals.”  The scientists have identified the gene responsible for the signal.  If scientists can generate that signal in other plants, perhaps through genetic engineering or selective breeding, they might trigger more nitrogen fixation in crops without fertilizer.  World farmlands could remain more productive as population grows while simultaneously reducing pollution by nitrous oxide (a highly potent greenhouse gas) and other fertilizer byproducts.  “When you deal with a natural soil, you are dealing with a lot of complexity.  Everything we learn about what makes symbiosis work gives us a tool to understand why, sometimes, symbiosis fails,” said Long.  “Plant breeders who are trying to help develop better-adapted plants can now analyze traits such as this.  We’ve given them a new tool” – a tool that was there all along, but needs a little prying and coaxing.Energy the way plants make it:  There’s no more effective solar power plant than a plant, so why not plan to imitate plants?  PhysOrg said that’s just what scientists in France are trying to do.  Photosynthesis may become the next new source of electrical energy.  The team has found a way to convert the chemical energy from photosynthesis into electrical energy in biofuel cells.  “They thus propose a new strategy to convert solar energy into electrical energy in an environmentally-friendly and renewable manner.”    This kind of biomimetics actually employs a real plant – in this case, a cactus.  By implanting special enzyme-modified electrodes sensitive to the products of photosynthesis, the French scientists were able to generate 9 watts per square centimeter.  They could see more juice when the light was turned up.  They envision not only more efficient solar cells, but medical applications.  Similar biofuel electrodes in human skin, sensitive to glucose and oxygen in biological fluids, could power implanted medical devices autonomously, without batteries or external power sources.In each of these stories, evolution was either ignored or mentioned only in passing.  This indicates that the heavy lifting in the scientific research is being done without it.  Instead, the impetus of the research is drawn from attention to biological design.Biomimetics could well be a major player in the downfall of Darwinism.  For one thing, evolutionary theory has very little to do with biomimetics, if anything.  Saying stupid things like, “This organism figured this out 150 million years ago,” or, “Four phyla came up with this elegant solution independently,” contributes only entertainment, not substance.  For another, biomimetics is a completely positive enterprise.  Scientists don’t have to get bogged down in philosophical debates about origins.  They can get funding, work constructively, increase understanding of nature, and come up with Nobel-prize-quality discoveries that will help the world – all without Darwin.  Here is a positive alternative to evolution that relies on intelligent design assumptions.  The wealth that can be generated is enormous.  Darwin will be left in the dust as the world stampedes to biomimetic technology.  Think Michael Behe’s famous illustration as we repeat, “If you can build a better mousetrap, the world will beat a path to your door.”(Visited 10 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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From Finland to SA’s Fifa Cup

first_imgMeeting Nelson Mandela on Robben Islandduring the 2003 Fifa inspection tour wasthe highlight of Pertti Alaja’s trip to SouthAfrica. “Playing in a Fifa World Cup is anunparalleled experience for a footballer,”says Pertti Alaja.When former Finland international goalkeeper Pertti Alaja received a call last year on his mobile phone from a number starting with +27, he had a flutter of excitement.Alaja knew it was the international dialling code for South Africa, and on the other side of the line a voice with an offer he knew instantly he couldn’t refuse.“When the proposal came for me to join South Africa’s 2010 Fifa World Cup Organising Committee, it took me less than 10 seconds to say yes,” he says.As an 18-year-old, Alaja  made his debut for Finland’s biggest and most successful club, HJK Helsinski, going on to be a colossus in the Finnish national team for over a decade between 1973 and 1983.He is now tournament director for Fifa’s 2009 Confederations Cup and 2010 World Cup, but even before his appointment he knew South Africa well.In 2003 Alaja was part of the five-person Fifa inspection group that assessed candidate countries bidding for the right to host the 2010 World Cup. He was immediately drawn to the country, and his was a ringing endorsement of South Africa’s credentials as a prospective host country.“I love this country. I know these people,” he says. “The decision of whether I would be interested in supporting South Africa in its efforts to host the Fifa World Cup was an easy one.”It is not just his love of football that made his decision easy, it was also his passion for a country he first visited in 1996. This made him determined to help make the first Fifa World Cup on African soil a success.“When I came in 2003 I was confident that the country would be able to host a very good Fifa Confederations Cup and Fifa World Cup,” Alaja says. “Now that I am here and actively working on the project, that belief hasn’t changed.”As tournament director, Alaja’s job is to take the planning of the Fifa World Cup from head office to venue operations, as it’s in the host cities and the country’s 10 stadiums where the tournament will actually take place.“It is about building a bridge between the two [head office and venue operations]” he says. “My job is to work with the venues to create an environment for Fifa to take over tournament operations. I have to make sure that the matches are played according to Fifa standards and will be safe, happy and joyful.”An experienced administrator, Alaja has been a Fifa general coordinator at a number Fifa tournaments and was general-secretary of Finland’s Football Association.He also managed the Nordic bid – by Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland – to  host Euro 2008, which was ultimately won by Switzerland and Austria. Before coming to South Africa, Alaja was national director of the SOS Children’s Villages Association of Finland.Alaja has been impressed with the Organising Committee’s venue managers and the committee members themselves. “Progress is being made and I am confident in their ability to deliver,” he says.A passionate man with football in his veins, Alaja played alongside legendary South African footballers like Vusi “Computer” Lamola in his day.“My dad was a priest and in Finland religion and sport go hand in hand. My father played football and it was natural that my siblings and I would be intimately involved in the sport too.“Playing for your country is the true fulfilment of your dreams,” says Alaja.Alaja was never able to represent Finland at a Fifa World Cup, but he sees his new vocation, as part of a committed South Africa working hard to successfully deliver the Fifa World Cup, as a calling.“Playing in a Fifa World Cup is an unparalleled experience for a footballer. It is a theatre of players and the whole world is watching – there is no better opportunity for your career.“But this is also a unique opportunity to tell the world what South Africa is really about. Some may know Cape Town, but South Africa is really a world in one country. All the nine host cities are completely different. From the relaxed beachside city of Port Elizabeth to Johannesburg, which few will know is one of the greenest cities in the world; this event has the potential to turn South Africa into a tourism mecca.“As a country progress has already been made. The nation is already more confidence in itself, in its abilities,” Alaja says. Do you have queries or comments about this article? Email Mary Alexander at [email protected]last_img read more

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Facebook Now Tracking Gross National Happiness; Continues Hoarding Data

first_img8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Facebook announced this afternoon that it is tracking what it calls its version of Gross National Happiness, based on an analysis of the positive and negative words people use when updating their Facebook status. It’s very interesting to see how people feel about various world events that Facebook has cross referenced – US users are more happy on Thanksgiving than on Christmas, for example.The new index is interesting, but it’s also a frustrating example of just how much value Facebook is withholding by not allowing everyone access to the anonymous, aggregated activity and conversation of more than 300 million people. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… marshall kirkpatrick Tags:#news#NYT#web Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Related Posts Almost a year ago we wrote about how a widely discussed Facebook Sentiment Engine could be a huge asset. That theoretical possibility held at least as much potential as the very real Google data about most popular searches minute-by-minute during the last Presidential debates.One best-case scenario we imagined looked like this:Think of the non-commercial, public interest kind of data that could be acquired. When the economic stimulus plan of 2009 was first announced on national television – what was the reaction of people in their mid twenties who lived in the Mid West of the US? Was that collective reaction substantially different from the reaction of self-identified queer people of color living in the North East US? How did the public reaction to the proposed plan change one hour, one day or one week after the announcement? This is all very interesting and potentially valuable data that could be, for the first time in history, available in near real time. Just by listening to what people are talking about in status updates and comments.Unfortunately, that’s not what Facebook has given us. It’s almost a year later and all we get is a hands-off graph showing that people were sad when Heath Ledger died and were happy on National Holidays. What a tragic loss of public access to a valuable resource that we ourselves are creating.If the movement to make social networking a distributed, decentralized phenomenon ends up succeeding and capturing these kinds of benefits of scale – we’re going to look back at this point in history and think it’s absurd that one company kept so much important knowledge from society at large.last_img read more

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The Eastern Conference Playoffs Are All About Grudge Matches

Welcome to The Lab, FiveThirtyEight’s basketball podcast. On Monday’s show (April 23, 2018), Neil and Kyle discuss three tight series in the Eastern Conference playoffs. Toronto, Boston and Cleveland are each tied 2-2 against their lower-seeded opponents — how much trouble are the favored teams in?The Lab will be back with another episode later this week. In the meantime, keep an eye on FiveThirtyEight’s NBA predictions, which are updated after every game. More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed By Neil Paine and Kyle Wagner Embed Code read more

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Jon Gruden witness to Braxton Millers spring performance

“They’ve got a hot-shot guy in here from Dayton. No. 5 is all I know. Braxton is his name. He’s pretty darn good.” That’s what NFL analyst and Super Bowl-winning coach Jon Gruden said about Ohio State freshman quarterback Braxton Miller after spending Wednesday and Thursday watching the team practice. Gruden was the keynote speaker at Friday’s coaches clinic. The skills that earned Gruden’s lofty praise were on full display Saturday during OSU’s annual Spring Game. Miller completed seven of 12 passes for 73 yards and a touchdown, and also led the offense on a 14-play, 92-yard touchdown drive. Coach Jim Tressel took notice. “I thought Braxton probably played a little bit more relaxed and had a little bit more fun than he has had,” Tressel said. Miller, who enrolled at OSU for Winter Quarter to get acclimated to the offense, has been thrust into a quarterback competition after incumbent starter, senior quarterback Terrelle Pryor, was suspended for the first five games of next season. Since enrolling, Miller has spent much of his time just trying to learn the offense. Senior linebacker Andrew Sweat, who enrolled early when he was a freshman, said Miller has done well so far. “I came in early as a freshman, and it’s overwhelming,” Sweat said. “I think Braxton does a great job of being mature and learning the plays. I think he’ll be a good player.” On Saturday, Miller showed the dual-threat capabilities that made him such a highly prized recruit coming out of high school by routinely avoiding the pass rush and rushing for 19 yards on five carries. Senior running back Dan Herron said Miller’s elusiveness adds another dimension to the offense. “When you got a guy back there like Braxton who can throw it or run it, it gives you a lot of options,” Herron said. Joe Bauserman, Taylor Graham and Kenny Guiton are also in the mix to replace Pryor and all have more experience with the offense than Miller. But Tressel said Miller will have as much opportunity as anyone. “We’re going to play whoever we need to, and it doesn’t exclude Braxton,” Tressel said. Miller, who was the only quarterback to complete more than half of his passes, has played well enough to be in consideration to become the starter, and has also gained his teammates’ respect. “I was curious to see how he was going to do today in more of a live setting,” senior center Mike Brewster said. “And I told him. I said: ‘Man, you did a good job today. I’m proud of you.’ He’s just a high school guy out there doing that stuff. That’s pretty impressive.” But, Brewster said, spring ball is only the beginning. The right to be the starter in the fall might be earned during the next three months, as the team takes a break from practicing until summer camp. “Over the next few months, he’ll be in the film room learning,” Brewster said. “I’m sure Terrelle will be bringing him along.” Pryor, Herron, offensive lineman Mike Adams, wide receiver DeVier Posey and defensive lineman Solomon Thomas are suspended for the first five games of the 2011 season for selling memorabilia and receiving improper benefits. Tressel will join them for failing to report their violations. read more

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Ohio State mens soccer season ends with 20 loss to Michigan State

Senior defender Sage Gardner misses a penalty kick during a match against Michigan State in the first round of the Big Ten Tournament Nov. 13 at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. OSU lost, 2-0.Credit: Elizabeth Dickey / Lantern photographerFor the fourth consecutive season, the Ohio State men’s soccer team (5-8-5, 1-3-2) fell in the first round of the Big Ten tournament.After a scoreless first half, the Michigan State Spartans (11-4-3, 3-2-1) scored two goals in a span of 12 minutes en route to a 2-0 victory over the Buckeyes.Buckeye coach John Bluem said the team was well aware of the level of difficulty the Spartans brought into Wednesday’s match.“We knew that we were in for a difficult game and Michigan State is a very good team,” Bluem said. “We had to be at our very best to get a result tonight and we fell a little bit short of that.”The Spartans’ first goal came in the 57th minute when redshirt-senior midfielder Brent McIntosh scored his first goal of the season from 10 yards out.The Buckeyes had a chance to tie just three minutes later after Buckeye freshman forward Danny Jensen earned a Buckeye penalty kick when he was taken down inside the Spartan penalty box. Senior defender Sage Gardner took the shot for OSU, but the ball bounced off the crossbar and went out of bounds for a Spartan goal kick.Bluem said the missed penalty and the pressure of being down a goal was too much to rebound.“The first goal we made some bad mistakes and allowed them a goal,” Bluem said. “Then we have a chance to get back into it and unfortunately, Sage hits a great penalty but it’s an inch too much to the left. That kind of took the wind out of us.”In the 69th minute, the Spartans added to their lead after a goal from sophomore midfielder Sean Conerty. He scored after he received a bouncing ball on the left side of the box and volleyed it off the far post outside of Buckeye redshirt-junior goalkeeper Alex Ivanov’s reach.Junior midfielder Ryan Ivancic said the pressure from the second goal distracted the team from performing their original game plan.“We didn’t keep the ball as much as we wanted to,” Ivancic said. “They’re a good team. They put us under a lot of pressure.”Ivanov recorded nine saves in the game, bringing his total for the season to 110, good for fifth in program history for single-season saves.Bluem said the play of Ivanov throughout the season kept the team alive in some difficult times.“Ivy (Ivanov) has had a brilliant season,” Bluem said. “Without him, things could have been worse. He had a great year.”The Spartans ended the match with a 20-16 advantage in shots.The Buckeyes have been playing all season with a majority of younger players, having 10 freshmen, two walk-ons and five transfers. Ivancic said the inexperience may have played a role in the loss.“We’ve been playing with that (inexperience) all year and we found a stride in the last five games of the season,” Ivancic said. “But I think (inexperience) might have a little to do with it. They’re an older team and physicality showed a bit today.”Following the loss, other OSU players declined to comment. read more

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Football Hilliard Babb suffer injuries sidelining them indefinitely

Ohio State then-redshirt sophomore linebacker Justin Hilliard walks into the Hyatt Place to check in for fall camp on Aug. 6. Credit: Colin Hass-Hill | Sports Editor.Ohio State confirmed Tuesday that senior linebacker Justin Hilliard and redshirt freshman wide receiver Kamryn Babb have sustained injuries that will sideline both indefinitely. The announcement did not come with clarification as to what the injuries were for both players. Lettermen Row reported Monday that Babb had sustained a non-contact knee injury after suffering an ACL tear that kept him off the field for the 2018 season. Ohio State did not confirm the specific injury for the redshirt freshman receiver, only that he would have surgery on the injury within the next week. According to the release, Hilliard has already had surgery for his injury. A former five-star recruit, Hilliard played in 12 games for the Buckeyes last season, accumulating 20 tackles, including a tackle for loss against Tulane on Sept. 22. Hilliard has played in 29 games for the Buckeyes in his four years with the program, recording 38 total tackles. read more

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Everton closing in on first summer addition

first_imgEverton are closing in on their first summer signing of this transfer window, according to Daily Post.The Toffees are close to completing the signing of Richarlison from Watford FC.Richarlison went through a medical procedure at the club’s training ground on Monday as they look to complete their first summer addition.Reports emerged last week, that new boss Marco Silva wanted the Brazilian forward at Goodison Park and that Everton were close to agreeing terms on a deal to sign him.The 21-year-old and Silva spent time together at Vicarage road last season before Silva was unceremoniously sacked by Watford midway through the season.Premier LeaguePremier League Betting: Match-day 5 Stuart Heath – September 14, 2019 Going into the Premier League’s match-day five with a gap already beginning to form at the top of the league. We will take a…It is believed that Richarlison was at Finch farm earlier on Monday as he looks set to complete a £40million move to reunite with his former boss.The former Fluminense forward had an amazing start to life in the Premier League with five goals in his first 12 games but failed to find the net after that.Everton and Watford were locked in a managerial tussle last season after the Toffees approached then Watford manager Marco Silva in October to replace the already sacked Ronald Koeman.Silva was eventually relieved of his duties as Watford boss in January as results on the pitch deteriorated and the club hierarchy sensing his lack of commitment towards them.The Portuguese gaffer was named as Everton manager last month after the club got rid of Sam Allardyce on May 31.last_img read more

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I see a very good team Stephan Lichtsteiner

first_imgThe Switzerland captain has been with Arsenal for the last three months and now he’s ready to play in the UEFA Europa LeagueStephan Lichtsteiner has recently joined Arsenal from Italian Lega Serie A team Juventus.The multifaceted Swiss footballer has only played once with The Gunners in the English Premier League, but he’s ready to give his all in the UEFA Europa League.Lichtsteiner and Arsenal will host Vorskla tomorrow in Matchday 1 of the competition.And the Swiss athlete believes his current team is very good and has a lot of quality.Jadon SanchoMerson believes Arsenal should sign Sancho Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Borussia Dortmund winger Jadon Sancho might be the perfect player to play for the Gunners, according to former England international Paul Merson.“I’ve already seen good personalities in this team. I think of course if you have experienced players in the team, it’s good for young players who can use you as an example of how to work,” he told Arsenal’s official website.“I don’t feel that there’s not a big personality in this team. I see a very good team with a lot of quality, a lot of good players and characters. I don’t see a problem.”“I’m not frustrated but of course I’m not used to being on the bench more than three times in a row. It’s also a new situation for me and I’m curious how I’ll manage it,” he added.“I’m here to work, to get better personally, to get better with the team and I think we are in a very good way. I’m trying to start more and for that, I have to work, that’s the only thing I can do at this moment to show the coach that I’m ready to play.”“We are in a good way, I’m in a very good way and ready to play,” he concluded.last_img read more

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