Irish: We don’t need a bailout

first_img Share whatsapp KCS-content Tags: NULL Irish: We don’t need a bailout Sunday 14 November 2010 11:33 pmcenter_img whatsapp THE Irish government yesterday continued to deny that the country is insolvent, but admitted that “ongoing contacts” continue with international officials “in light of current market conditions”.The admission from the Ministry of Finance yesterday marks a striking shift of tone from earlier statements which dismissed reports that Ireland was discussing a bailout package.Justice minister Dermot Ahern told RTE News earlier in the day that media stories suggesting that talks had begun over a rescue worth €60bn-€80bn (£51bn-£68bn) were “a fiction”. “There are no negotiations going on. If there were, the government would be aware of it and we are not aware of it,” he claimed. The finance department has also stated that Ireland has enough funding to last “well into 2011”, meaning it will not have to borrow at current yields of 8.1 per cent on ten-year gilts. But economists are sceptical that an austerity budget next month can solve the republic’s debt crisis, even if it is funded for now. Official estimates suggest that its deficit will soar to an eye-watering 32 per cent of GDP this year and the government has refused to deny that it might need rescuing.If Ireland does need help, the British taxpayer could be on the hook for up to £15bn under a deal signed by Alistair Darling just before the formation of the coalition government.The republic is under huge pressure internationally to announce that it will seek a bailout before the meeting of Eurozone members tomorrow, in part from larger members of the single currency. The 16 countries are due to discuss reforms of the European Financial Stability Facility, a bailout fund created after Greece’s international rescue. Attempting to calm the markets, Germany denied that it is pushing for Ireland to accept a bailout in order to stabilise the Eurozone and enable a freer discussion of sovereign debt crises at tomorrow’s meeting. But it was German chancellor Angela Merkel’s remarks that private bondholders should accept a “haircut” on their investment if a country defaults that sent Irish ten-year gilt yields to nine per cent on Thursday.Whatever bailout plans the Eurozone adopts should not come into effect until 2013, but this has not stopped bond yields rising across the Eurozone periphery. Portuguese ten-year yields hit seven per cent and Spanish hit 4.6 per cent on Thursday.Ireland is fighting vehemently to avoid a bailout, with O’Keeffe admitting that it would mean giving up its “hard-won sovereignty”. Show Comments ▼last_img read more

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Nigerian Breweries Plc (NB.ng) HY2020 Interim Report

first_imgNigerian Breweries Plc (NB.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Beverages sector has released it’s 2020 interim results for the half year.For more information about Nigerian Breweries Plc (NB.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Nigerian Breweries Plc (NB.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Nigerian Breweries Plc (NB.ng)  2020 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileNigerian Breweries Plc is the largest brewing company in Nigeria producing the nation’s favourite brew, STAR. The company boasts one of the most modern brew houses in the country producing a popular range of lager, stout, malt drinks, ready-to-drink beverages, cider, carbonated soft drinks and energy drinks for local consumption and for export. Lager brands include STAR, Heineken, Gulder, Goldber, “33 Export”, Life, More and Stella; the stout brand is Legend; the malt brand is Amstel Malta; the ready-to-drink brand is Ace Passion; the cider brand is Strongbow Apple Cider; the soft drink brand is fayrouz and the energy drink brand is Climax. Nigerian Breweries Plc has 11 breweries, 2 malting plants and 26 sales depots; enjoys a growing export market; and offers sales and logistic and marketing support to merchants and vendors. Brands in the product portfolio are available in 13 countries including the United Kingdom, South Africa, the United States and various countries in Middle-East and West Company. Its company head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. Nigerian Breweries Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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Western NY Episcopal, Roman Catholic bishops speak with one voice

first_img Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC January 18, 2015 at 6:14 pm We are, indeed, our brothers’ (and sisters’) keepers. Thank you, Bishop Malone and Bishop Franklin, for reminding us. And equally, thank you for speaking together. I was a Roman Catholic nun: I am currently an Episcopalian; I am also an Associate and closely connected to my community of which I was a vowed member. I thank God daily for speaking in such diverse ways to diverse people–and inspiring us to care for the Universe together. Featured Events Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA MARGO FLETCHER says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Smithfield, NC Kenneth Knapp says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing By Laurie WozniakPosted Dec 15, 2014 Submit a Press Release Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Christine Weber-Kearney says: Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service Western NY Episcopal, Roman Catholic bishops speak with one voice Call for Buffalo’s new prosperity to shared with all Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Overlooking evidence of construction and new life in Buffalo, New York, Roman Bishop Richard J. Malone, left, and Episcopal Bishop R. William Franklin met recently to discuss their final thoughts about the historic joint pastoral letter they co-authored. The letter, which calls for the new prosperity taking root in Buffalo to be shared with all, was read in churches on the Third Sunday in Advent. Photo: Diocese West New York[Episcopal Diocese of Western New York] Bishop R. William Franklin of the Episcopal Diocese of Western New York and Bishop Richard J. Malone of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Buffalo are asking members of their respective churches to do what they can to insure that the new economic growth and opportunity in Western New York is shared among all people.The joint pastoral letter, co-written by both bishops, was issued on the Third Sunday of Advent, Dec. 14. It is believed to be the first joint pastoral letter in the history of the two dioceses. [The complete text of the letter is here].“A new generation of Western New Yorkers is envisioning new opportunities and making them a reality. With regard to education, medicine, technology and quality of life, this is the time for which we have all waited and prayed and worked. This wave of prosperity benefits not only the city, but the entire region,” they wrote. “Yet at this time not everyone is benefiting. Blacks and Hispanics still live in poverty in greater proportion than do other groups in our population. Children still go to bed hungry. Jobs and security elude too many families. And because some are left out and locked out, the rest of us are poorer. We fail to benefit as much as we might from this new golden age.”In announcing the letter, Malone explained that their goal “is really to raise consciousness among our own parishioners, both in the Catholic and Episcopal dioceses. Perhaps in a humble way to suggest, here is a lens that the two bishops are providing to which we as Christians can look, both at the reasons for hope right now with the development happening in our area, but also to see the challenges and opportunities to make sure what is happening becomes inclusive of the broad spectrum of our people.”“I think we’re saying this is a great moment of renewal for Buffalo and the region, but it’s also a moment of renewal of Christian values, of dignity and opening dignity to all people,” Franklin added. “We are speaking as bishops to our own people, but we’re also speaking to business and political leaders to say, ‘Let us not lose this opportunity to create a new city, which is beyond a new city of hotels and apartment buildings, but a new city of justice.’ We think it’s a fantastic opportunity for growth, not just economically, but spiritual growth for our region.”“This is consistent with both our churches’ teachings for centuries,” Malone said. “It speaks to the relationship of the church with the modern world. We see it as a time for breaking down barriers and answering the question, ‘Who is my neighbor?’”“Too many barriers remain,” said Malone. “It is like there is a wedge in the community.”In the City of Buffalo the poverty rate in 2013 increased to 31.4% overall according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Even more shocking is the 50.6% poverty rate reported for children under the age of 18.Overall poverty rates in some of the region’s more rural counties are also high — 19.1% in Chautauqua, 17.2 in Cattaraugus and 17.1% in Allegany.“We are really talking about a wall that we sometimes forget,” said Franklin. “This moment of economic opportunity allows us an opportunity to address that wall and say that all can rise together. This is part of the message of the Gospel.“Economic opportunity leads to human dignity. That’s a reality,” he said. “So it’s a spiritual value to open the workforce to a more diverse population. It’s good business, because it’s opening a perspective of people who may be left out of a boardroom or a workplace.”The bishops acknowledge that many people are already reaching out to less fortunate people. But great needs remain — needs that must be addressed in our spiritual lives, community circles, the business sector and the civic arena. Franklin cited Terry Pegula and his wife Kim as two businesspeople who strive to make their workforce inclusive of women and minorities. The Pegulas own three sport franchises in Buffalo, the Buffalo Sabres, the Buffalo Bandits and the Buffalo Bills. They are also the developers of the new HarborCenter in Buffalo’s Waterfront district.“Every single Christian, whether they are in a position of leadership or not, I think, is called upon to tend to the concerns we put out there, said Malone. “This is to support those who are already moving in that direction and also to stimulate the attention and commitment of others.”The bishops envision this letter being a springboard for conversations in parishes.“A letter like this one, I think, is an invitation to everybody who reads it and those who have written it, to an ongoing examination of our own consciousness around these issues,” Malone said.“It’s probably never happened between our two dioceses, and probably rarely happened in any other parts of the United States, that an Episcopal bishop and a Roman Catholic bishop have issued a joint pastoral,” said Bishop Franklin. “That has an importance because when bishops issue a pastoral like this, we’re saying you really need to read this or make this available. It’s a solemn moment when two bishops speak like this. I think the fact that we feel comfortable to speak together is a sign of the kind of energy that we want our region to project. We’re trying to symbolize bringing our communities together to speak together, so that in other ways communities may be brought together.”Sharing the same Gospel values and deep love and concern for their adopted home paved the way for the writing of the letter.“It’s a chance to strengthen the human community that is the common factor. Generally, [our two dioceses are] the same territory with the same issues, the same challenges, and the same opportunities and hopes,” Malone explained. The Episcopal Diocese of Western New York includes New York State’s seven most western counties: Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Erie, Genesee, Niagara, Orleans and Wyoming. The Roman Catholic Diocese of Buffalo covers the same seven, plus the largely rural Allegany County.The genesis of the letter began months ago. That it is issued now, when streets in many American cities are filled with protestors seeking racial equality and justice, is a coincidence.Today’s protests take Franklin back to his childhood in segregated Mississippi in the 1950s. It was, he says, illegal for him to interact with half the population of his state. In the face of laws that forbade black and white citizens from sitting down together in public places, his grandmother organized meals in her home that brought individuals of both races together.“As a boy I saw black and white holding hands together at my grandmother’s dining room table, so in a way I am following the inspiration I already saw in the 1950s of holding out our hands to one another.“We’ve come a long way in our region and in our churches,” Franklin added, “and yet [Bishop Malone and I] are saying the job is not over.” In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ecumenical & Interreligious Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ December 26, 2014 at 5:11 pm They are certainly not the first clergy in either the Episcopal or Roman Catholic Churches to mistake a call to politics for a call to the priesthood. Rector Belleville, IL Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI December 15, 2014 at 5:09 pm I am wondering if these illustrious bishops have heard of the 1% . I suggest they both readThomas Piketty’s book Capitalism in 20th century. Tags The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Comments (3) New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Pittsburgh, PA Comments are closed. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

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100% rise in number of suicides in Donegal

first_img Pinterest 100% rise in number of suicides in Donegal Previous articlePriest in Derry to meet dissident familiesNext articleNorthWest MEP JIm Higgans wants Anglo wound down in next 2 years News Highland Google+ Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Twitter WhatsApp 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North There’s been a 100% rise in the number of suicides in Donegal according to the Central Statistics Office.Figures published this week by the CSO show there were 20 recorded suicides in the county last year, compared to 10 in 2008, with the county’s recorded suicide rate now higher than the national average.Fr James Sweeney has worked in the suicide prevention field for several years. He says the increase is not a surprise, and believes the true figures are even higher.[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/frjam1pm1.mp3[/podcast] Facebook WhatsApp Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal center_img By News Highland – September 7, 2010 Twitter News Google+ RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Pinterest 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan firelast_img read more

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Greeks support CAC fundraiser

first_img By The Penny Hoarder Latest Stories Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits The Troy University Greek community comes together annually for Greek Week which includes raising funds for a worthy cause. Kristen Rushing, Greek Week director, presented a check in the amount of $2,500 to the Pike Regional Child Advocacy Center. Pictured, from left, Sardis William, assistant director of Student Involvement; Rushing; Carrie Manning, Pike Regional Child Advocacy Center Board of Directors; Traci Leverett, PRCAC Board of Directors and coordinator of Student Involvement; and Romi Shah, Greek Week committee member. Book Nook to reopen Skip Sponsored Content Greeks support CAC fundraiser Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthGet Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Email the author The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… “With the purchase of the colposcope, children who have been the alleged victims of sexual abuse will be examined at the Pike Regional CAC by a physician or trained sexual assault nurse examiner rather than having to travel 100 miles for the exam,” Leverette said. “That will greatly reduce the trauma of the examination.”Leverette said the examination room at the PRCAC will be remodeled so that it is child friendly.“That, too, will reduce the trauma for the child,” she said. center_img Kristen Rushing, Troy University Greek Week director, presented a check in the amount of $2,500 to Carrie Manning and Traci Leverett, members of the Pike Regional Child Advocacy Center board of directors, in support of the CAC’s Leis of Love Luau fundraiser Thursday night at J. Michelle’s Special Events.Manning and Leverett accepted the donation with great appreciation from the CAC board, the staff and the children and families that will benefit from the caring and generosity of the Greeks.Leverette said the proceeds from the Leis of Love Luau will fund the purchase of a colposcope that is needed for forensic medical exams as well as renovations to a room at the CAC facility. Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Patriots travel to Selma to take on Morgan Academy in season opener Despite the soaring temperatures and momentary downpours, the Pike Liberal Arts Patriots are ready to begin the 2019 season on… read more Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration By Jaine Treadwell Print Article The cost of the colposcope and the renovation is estimated at around $60,000.Manning said the support of the Troy University Greeks has been ongoing and is making the differ Published 6:37 pm Tuesday, August 20, 2019 You Might Likelast_img read more

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Time to turn theory into practice

first_imgNew management theories are coming in thick and fast, but are they gettingus anywhere? Lucie Carrington guides us around the latest research and how itcan best be implemented in the workplacePity your poor colleagues in management development as once again,management education and training in the UK gets a pasting. This time it comes from US business guru, Professor Michael Porter. The linkbetween competitiveness and management performance is irrefutable, he suggests– and that management performance in the UK is found lacking. Leaders just arenot what they used to be and there just aren’t enough of them. It is all rather depressing for all those engaged in trying to improvemanagement performance who feel they have really pushed the agenda forward overthe past decade in their efforts to provide what UK business needs. This includesthe business schools, training firms and hard-pressed corporate trainers andmanagement development experts. But haven’t we been here before? Only last year the Council for Excellencein Management and Leadership (CEML) slammed UK management development as a”dysfunctional system”. Fourteen years earlier, Charles Handy andJohn Constable did something similar in what were then regarded as seminalreports intothe state of UK management. There is indeed a fantastic amount of activity – much of it publicly funded– looking into the role of management at the moment. Following the CEML reportlast May, the Government issued its response in September when it announced itwould set up an advisory panel of ministers and business leaders. Competition lag The Department of Trade and Industry followed this by commissioning ProfPorter to undertake his study into why UK competitiveness lags behind the US,France and Germany. This is part funded by the Economic and Social ResearchCouncil, which is also bankrolling a massive £17m management research projectcalled the Advanced Institute of Management (AIM). Its avowed purpose is alsoto provide new support for UK competitiveness. Finally, this year, the Chartered Management Institute has announced a majoroverhaul of what are called the national occupational standards for managers,for publication later this year. It is hardly surprising that faced with such missionary zeal to find theperfect management solution, the training community appears slightly weary.”There may be moments of great excitement ahead,” says JuliaMiddleton, chief executive of Common Purpose, of all the work currentlyongoing. “But I have no doubt that it will become an irrelevance in itsdelivery.” Redemption She finds endless attempts to turn leadership into a complicated scienceslightly ridiculous. What is needed is not more research into such areas asstrategic thinking, but lots of examples of management successes, she says. “We need information from people who have done it – been managers. Whatwe don’t want is models produced by people who have never led anything,”she says. There is just too much publishing and not enough doing, confirms ProfessorDavid Norburn, director of Imperial College Business School. “We are toobusy looking for some absolute truth in management – one route toredemption,” he explains. “As a result, whatever Porter says will bepromulgated on the business and training scene as the truth. He will have hisacolytes.” But there is no single truth, there is only what works, argues Norburn, andin our endless search for the truth we often forget what has worked in thepast. There are some basic principles of knowledge management we need to applyto general management, he says. “We shall only progress if we aretransferring knowledge inside the company about what worked.” One current truth seems to be that middle management is somehow failingthrough lack of education and training. Norburn disputes this. We do not needmore middle management education, rather business needs to use what we alreadyhave by forging closer links with colleges and providers, he says. “The diploma in management studies (DMS) has been around since the1960s. There could be all sorts of reasons why more people do not use it. “They might not know about it, HR departments might not know about itor sponsor it, or perhaps busy managers don’t have time to do it. But it isthere for managers to pick up,” continues Norburn. Why don’t employers use the DMS to build a real partnership with traininginstitutions? They could provide the real case studies and speakers to bringsuch qualifications to life for organisations and their managers, he says.Norburn argues this is what Imperial College Business School has been doingthrough its advisory board of senior public and private sector leaders.”Every one of our courses is vetted by our advisory for its relevance andcompetence,” he says. Competence framework Two or three years ago, the Skipton Building Society developed a newcompetence framework for its managers (see case study, below). It was an internal process. Head of personnel and training Ian Walker satdown with managers and asked them to define how they viewed successfulmanagement at the building society. Although it was an internally drivenprocess, Walker still sees value in ideas, structures and models arising fromacademic research. “We are a relatively large financial services organisation in a smallYorkshire town. There is a danger that we can become very inward looking. Externalbenchmarks and frameworks, are useful because they encourage us to lookoutwards,” he says. One of the skills of today’s corporate training professionals, therefore, isin being able to take these sorts of statements, fads and frameworks and workout what they would look like for their business and how they might supporttheir existing competencies. However, the key to all such benchmarking exercises is their relevance. Thisis a word both Middleton and Norburn also use a great deal. So it is interestingthat amid all the talk about what makes for sound management performance,Investors in People (IIP) UK has slipped out a product that may well fulfilthis need for relevance and practicality. IIP UK calls it a leadership andmanagement model. Core standard In practice, it is more of a framework that firms can use to test theirmanagement development processes and procedures against the standard IIPprinciples of commitment to investing in people, planning that investment,taking action and evaluating it. It is not integral to achieving the core standard, but follows a similarformat. So there are several indicators against each principle for firms tomeet along with guidance on the sort of evidence they can offer. As with thecore standard, it is subject to independent assessment based on interviews withcurrent and potential managers in the organisation. Last year Investors in People UK piloted the model in a variety oforganisations – finance houses, manufacturers, schools, even a GP’s surgery.”It’s a self-help model,” says IIP chief executive Ruth Spellman.”Our aim is to help organisations create the environment in whichleadership can flourish. It’s about growing managerial and leadership talentwithin the organisation. “We are asking organisations some demanding questions and putting themthrough a rigorous self-assessment process. But it’s not a mechanisticapproach,” she insists. Given all the rubbish theories that are published about management andleadership, IIP’s approach is almost too straightforward. There’s nothingprescriptive about it and it is not offering any management blueprint orabsolute truths of any sort. It does have its downside, however. To start with, it will only be as goodas the assessors IIP has trained up, and these have yet to prove themselves. Inaddition, the IIP model is only a framework. It’s not offering any guidance onwhat the management competencies or skills organisations need to achieve theirbusiness goals, nor is it offering any training. Finally, there is no point in any organisation even attempting to achievethe standard if it cannot guarantee full commitment to the idea from the top.It’s not enough for firms to invest in their high-flyers, they have to developtheir first line managers and chief executives as well. In short, organisationshave to be committed to change. This is as it should be, but IIP UK is not necessarily the organisation togalvanise top commitment. For all the support of people such as chairman TimMelville-Ross, it is still regarded as a training organisation by mostbusinesses – and thus an HR issue. Which takes us back full circle to all those high- profile,government-sponsored initiatives. The great advantage of headline-grabbingresearch and ideas such as Porter’s is that business leaders take note. Theyread about what their peers are up to, and they want to be ahead of the game. So before you throw away all those column inches on AIM, Porter, CEML andthe rest of it, think about how you can use them to persuade your chiefexecutive and finance director that your agenda and theirs are one and the sameSkipton BS pilots leadership IIP The Skipton Building Society ishoping to be the first organisation to receive the Investors in People (IIP)management and leadership accolade. Last year the building society piloted themodel for IIP and submitted its management development processes to two days ofrigorous interviewing from IIP assessors.”It was a reaffirming exercise,” says the buildingsociety’s head of personnel and training Ian Walker. He and his colleagues usedthe pilot to assess the success of its two existing management developmentprogrammes, Kickstart, for people new to management, and Accelerate toManagement, for those moving to more senior jobs.”The feedback we received from IIP was as we had hoped. Itconfirmed that people saw both these programmes as the route intomanagement,” he said.The building society also used the model to test a relativelynew mentoring scheme and, again, the results were positive. “It alsoshowed that our people saw mentoring and coaching as natural to theorganisations. They are part of our language.”Skipton Building Society achieved the IIP standard some yearsago. What impressed Walker about the management model is that, like IIP’s corestandard, it is flexible and works with an organisation’s existing managementdevelopment framework.If IIP had attempted to be prescriptive, Walker probablywouldn’t have bothered. “We had to ask ourselves, how is it relevant to usas an organisation and how did it fit into our competence framework,” saysWalker.”In fact, it very much fits in with what we believe isimportant to us as a business. We employ 1,100 people, many of them at its headoffice in Skipton where unemployment is a mere 1.3 per cent. Developing our ownmanagers and leaders is not a choice but something we have to do to survive andgrow our business.” As the chief executive told the assessors: “We grow peoplethrough the business. It’s what makes us different and makes certain we surviveand prosper.”Who are the key players?Investors in People UK (IIP) –runs the Government’s training standard IIP and has just launched a managementand leadership model for those clients who want something more.Tel: 020 7467 1900 www.investorsinpeople.co.ukAdvanced Institute of Management (AIM) – £17m research project fundedby the Economic and Social Research Council. Has been going for more than ayear now, headed by Professor Anne Sigismund Huff who is in the process of siftingthrough research bids from other scholars.  Tel: 0870 734 3000  www.esrc.ac.ukChartered Management Institute (CMI) – a membership organisation forindividual managers and keeper of the national occupational standards formanagers. These are the rump of what long-in-the-tooth training managers mightremember as the Management Charter Initiative. CMI has embarked on an overhaulof the standards to be published later this year.  Tel: 01536 204222  www.inst-mgt.org.ukCouncil for Excellence in Management and Leadership (CEML) –government-funded study published last year damning the state of UK managementand management education. Following the Government’s response to its report inSeptember, CEML effectively disbanded. But its website lives on.  www.managementandleadershipcouncil,org/Institute of Leadership & Management (ILM) – a subsidiary of City& Guilds, ILM brings together the Institute of Supervisory Management (ISM)and the national examinations board for supervisors NEBS Management.  www.i-l-m.comFurther contactsCommon Purpose www.commonpurpose.co.ukImperial College Business School Tel: 020 7589 5111 www.ms.ic.ac.uk Time to turn theory into practiceOn 1 Mar 2003 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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Supraglacial debris along the front of the Larsen-A Ice Shelf, Antarctic Peninsula

first_imgSemi-continuous, linear accumulations of poorly-sorted debris are present on the surface of the remnant Larsen-A Ice Shelf, Antarctic Peninsula. These accumulations form a complex of debris bands extending parallel to the front of the ice shelf for several kilometres. Landsat imagery shows that the debris bands originated as lateral moraines along the Nordenskjöld Coast. Almost 80% of clasts sampled from these debris accumulations have shape/roundness characteristics consistent with glacier transport in the zone of basal traction. Angular and very angular clasts account for 15% and 22% of clasts in the pebble- and cobble/boulder-sized fractions, respectively, and originated by rockfall from valley/nunatak sides, with subsequent passive glacier transportation. Lithological analysis indicates that the debris is derived locally from the Nordenskjöld Coast, Cape Fairweather region and interior of the Antarctic Peninsula. Episodic melt-out and resedimentation of this debris from the front of the ice shelf would deliver pulses of coarse-grained sediment to the sea floor. Therefore, coarse-grained debris can also be released along the calving margin of small polar ice shelves fringing mountainous terrain, and could potentially be confused with sediment deposited at the grounding line of Antarctic ice-shelves. Sedimentological criteria to differentiate between these environments are proposed in this paper.last_img read more

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This 13-Year-Old Guitar Prodigy Shredded Vivaldi’s “Winter” At Winter Olympics Closing Ceremony [Watch]

first_imgIf, like us, you can’t get enough of this little rock star, you can head to his YouTube channel and check out more of his videos. We hope to hear more from this very talented young musician in the near future.[H/T Billboard] Last night, following more than two weeks of fierce competition, the 2018 Winter Olympics in South Korea officially came to an end with an extravagant closing ceremony at Pyeongchang Stadium. The lavish production featured countless talented performers showcasing various aspects of South Korean music and culture. However, one person, in particular, has won the affection of the Internet in the hours since last night’s production: 13-year old guitar prodigy Yang Tae-Hwan.At the climax of the multi-sensory celebration, the teenage guitarist led the massive ensemble through a stirringly appropriate rendition of the Vivaldi concerto “Winter”. The kid transformed the Four Seasons violin melody into a shred-hot barrage of electric guitar fire and ice, wailing away with perfectly-honed rock star swagger and charisma. As the announcer remarked at the end of the number, “They’re all good, but that 13-year-old can flat-out play.”The young guitarist was one of many talented people who contributed the best of themselves to the 2018 Winter Olympics. Hundreds of dancers, musicians, and other performers participated in the spectacles that were the opening and closing ceremonies and, of course, nearly 3,000 athletes competed to bring glory to themselves and their countries throughout the duration of the Olympics. But with one short performance on the very last day of the event, young Yang Tae-Hwan cemented his place among the biggest breakthrough stars at the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympics.You can watch a clip of 13-year-old Yang Tae-Hwan’s incredible performance at the closing ceremony of the 2018 Winter Olympics below via NBC:last_img read more

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Carpenter Center appoints new director

first_imgThe Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts (CCVA) announces the appointment of Dan Byers as the John R. and Barbara Robinson Family Director, effective June 1.Byers will oversee exhibitions and programs, developing a long-range vision for the CCVA that brings together artists, exhibitions, students, and communities at Harvard and beyond.“Dan Byers has a wealth of curatorial expertise, and he is arriving when ambitions for the arts at Harvard are stronger than ever,” said Robin Kelsey, dean of arts and humanities. “I look forward to supporting his efforts to make the Carpenter Center buzz and spark.”Byers said he was thrilled “to join the thriving arts community at Harvard, and honored to lead the Carpenter’s excellent staff to collaborate with colleagues close at hand in the Department of Visual and Environmental Studies, Harvard Film Archive, and Harvard Art Museums.”“I foresee a diverse program with artists at its center, building on CCVA’s recent reinvigoration, to create a program that is locally and internationally relevant, experimental, and inclusive, the kind of art center we need now more than ever,” said Byers.Byers has served as senior curator at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston since 2015. Recent projects included the solo exhibitions of Diane Simpson and Geoffrey Farmer, as well as the group exhibitions “The Artist’s Museum” and the 2017 “Foster Prize Exhibition.”Before his move to Boston, Byers was curator of modern and contemporary art at Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh. There, he served as co-curator, with Daniel Baumann and Tina Kukielski, of the 2013 “Carnegie International,” a widely acclaimed global exhibition that staged a conversation in four parts: a major exhibition of new international art, a project on artist- and architect-designed playgrounds, the museum’s collection, and an engagement with the city of Pittsburgh. Other projects included solo exhibitions by Cathy Wilkes, Ragnar Kjartansson, and James Lee Byars, as well as the group exhibitions “Ordinary Madness” and “Reanimation: Jones, Koester, Nashashibi/Skaer.”“Dan’s thoughtful, dynamic and collaborative curatorial practice is well-suited to the teaching and research mission of the University,” said Lynette Roth, head of the division of Modern and Contemporary Art at Harvard Art Museums. “We are eager to strengthen further our shared commitment to the production and exhibition of contemporary art with Dan at CCVA’s helm.”last_img read more

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Looming disaster averted in Vermont apple harvest

first_imgA looming disaster threatened by the combination of early-maturing apples and a hitch with visas for the guest workers to pick them has been averted, according to Senator Patrick Leahy and Vermont apple growers.With apple crops ripening 10 days to 14 days early this year, at least 19 orchards in Vermont and New York, and many more throughout the Northeast, had encountered an extra form-filing step in the annual process of recruiting temporary workers from Jamaica.  The added step – Request For Evidence (RFE) process requirements – comes in the aftermath of an 18-month investigation of the Jamaican Central Labour Organization.The process of approving visas for seasonal workers, under the longstanding H-2A guest worker program, is handled by two federal agencies: the U.S. Department of Labor, and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), a unit of the Department of Homeland Security.Leahy chairs the Senate Judiciary Committee which has jurisdiction over USCIS, and he also is the most senior member of the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry.  When Vermont growers told him about the problem, he and his staff immediately sought to rectify the situation.  Through Leahy’s efforts – including a personal call to USCIS Director Alejandro Mayorkas – USCIS now is expediting the process for all apple growers with pending H-2A petitions for workers from Jamaica to have their visa applications settled.  Leahy’s staff is also helping to expedite submissions to USCIS for agency review of growers’ RFE forms.“An entire season’s work was at risk, and crops don’t wait for paperwork,” said Leahy.  “I’m glad we found a commonsense solution for a happy ending after this close call.”Source: Leahy. 8.26.2010last_img read more

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