Marine technology inspired by dolphins speed

first_img Citation: Marine technology inspired by dolphins’ speed (2006, June 6) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2006-06-marine-technology-dolphins.html A bottlenose dolphin exhibits porpoising in the wake of a boat, a behavior that increases the animal’s swimming efficiency. The dolphin’s spindle-like body shape, along with other characteristics, continues to inspire marine vessel design. Photo credit: NASA. Since the days of Aristotle, humans have looked to dolphins with awe, envy and inspiration because of the marine animal’s speed and strength in the oceans. Swimming at speeds of up to 20 mph, the dolphin seems to defy nature’s laws. In fact, in the 1930s, the scientist James Gray thought that the power needed for the dolphin to swim at such speeds exceeded its available power nearly 10 times over, which is known as Gray’s paradox. To explain his paradox, Gray theorized that the water against the dolphin’s skin has layers that slide past each other and reduce drag, called “laminar boundary layers.” (It was previously assumed that the water against the skin was made of several mixed layers that increase drag, called “turbulent boundary layers.”) In actuality, no mechanisms have been demonstrated that maintain a completely laminar boundary layer for the dolphin.“While Gray may have missed the actual mechanism for the high swimming speed of dolphins, his focus on these extraordinary animals and their performance was not without merit,” scientist Frank Fish of West Chester University told PhysOrg.com. Fish, who has researched dolphin drag and propulsion for many years, recently published a review in Bioinspiration and Biomimetics examining the different mechanisms on drag reduction. “[Gray’s] focus on laminar and turbulent flows helped to define a large body of research on animals with consideration to their aquatic adaptations and energetics. Furthermore, because of Gray’s work, a whole new mechanism for drag reduction – compliant surfaces – was developed.”Today it’s common knowledge that Gray’s paradox had a few flawed assumptions: Gray calculated that dolphin musculature resembles that of humans, while in reality dolphin muscles can generate several times the power of human muscles. Also, Gray observed dolphins swimming at short sprints, but neglected to account for the greater power output generated by the type of muscle fiber (fast glycolytic) used for short bursts as opposed to the type of muscle fiber (slow oxidative) used for slow, sustained activity. Finally, Gray did not consider that the dolphin was using a passive drafting technique to swim at high speed. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. According to Gray’s paradox, dolphins swim faster than they should be able to. Since Gray, scientists have discovered flaws in the details of the paradox, although some explanations of these creatures’ aquatic grace have proven to hold more water than others.center_img Hidden oil spill: New study contradicts owner’s claims Explore further Despite the flaws in Gray’s paradox, however, the dolphin still possesses superior swimming capabilities compared with technologies from nautical engineering. Throughout the past several decades, scientists have offered a plethora of ideas explaining how the dolphin actually swims as quickly as it does. In his review, Fish examines how these ideas reduce drag, which range from mechanisms for laminar boundary layer conditions (viscous damping and accelerated flow), strategically located skin ridges, skin shedding/secretions, skin heating and others. The two most significant reasons, Fish concludes, are not special mechanisms, but rather the streamlined body shape and behavioral mechanisms.“Dolphins are among the fastest of marine creatures,” said Fish. “That ability is powered by large muscles that are mechanically linked to an oscillatory pair of flukes, producing thrust with greater efficiency than conventional marine propellers.”A dolphin’s “fusiform” body shape – with its rounded front, maximum thickness at 34-45% of the body length, and slowly tapering tail – allows water to flow inseparably from the body until the tail region. This delayed separation results in a small wake and reduced drag. Further, the crescent design of the flippers, dorsal fin and tail (“flukes”) of the dolphin reduce drag and can also efficiently generate lift when needed.Because dolphins belong to the cetacean order, they are mammals that require oxygen. However, wave drag at the surface can reach five times the frictional drag for a dolphin at one-half a body length under water, so the animals use a breathing method called “porpoising.” While maintaining high speeds, a dolphin partakes in a series of rhythmic leaps to the surface, and scientists calculate that it takes less energy to leap at these speeds than to swim an equivalent distance underwater. A second behavioral mechanism that dolphins employ is gliding, a behavior which allows lung collapse and minimizes buoyancy when descending in deep water, conserving both energy and oxygen. Finally, young dolphins often utilize drafting by swimming below the mid-section of the mother, taking advantage of flow structure and energy savings of up to 60%.Fish concluded that although Gray’s laminar boundary layer may not have been demonstrated for dolphins, the explanation – along with some of the other proposed ideas – could still have technological applications. “The need to move more economically on or under the water will necessitate the development of better propulsive systems,” he said. “This will be more important as we further explore the recesses of the ocean, on this planet or others. We currently rely upon rotating propellers to move ships and boats, but these devices have a limited efficient speed range.”Fish predicted that the development of new hull designs, skin mechanics and propulsive systems may take advantage of nature’s swimming mechanisms. “Submarine and autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) may benefit from copying the body design of dolphins to enhance not just speed but also maneuverability,” said Fish. “The elastic structure of the dolphin skin and its underlying blubber may serve as a model for future wetsuits or competitive swim suits. The arrangement of fibers applied to competition suits will reduce drag from vibrations and folds produced by the swimming motions of human swimmers. Perhaps swimmers in the next Olympics will wear suits based on dolphins to break existing records.”Citation: Fish, Frank E. “The myth and reality of Gray’s paradox: implication of dolphin drag reduction for technology.” Bioinspiration and Biomimetics. 1 (2006) R17-R25.By Lisa Zyga, Copyright 2006 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

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Luxims tiny plasma lightbulb outshines LEDs

first_img Explore further A Tic-Tac-sized lightbulb that gives off as much light as a streetlamp may offer a peek at the ultra-efficient lighting of the future. The bulb, developed by Luxim of Sunnyvale, California, uses plasma technology to achieve its brightness. Citation: Luxim’s tiny plasma lightbulb outshines LEDs (2008, March 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-03-luxim-tiny-plasma-lightbulb-outshines.html New nanomaterial to replace mercurycenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The tiny bulb contains an argon gas in the middle, as well as a component called a “puck.” The bulb is partially embedded in a dielectric material. When electrical energy is delivered to the puck, the puck acts like an electrical lens. It heats up the argon to a temperature of 6000 degrees Kelvin, and turns the gas into a plasma that gives off light. The plasma, whose 6000-degree temperature is similar to that of the surface of the sun, also emits a spectrum that looks very similar to the spectrum of sunlight.The plasma bulb uses 250 watts, and achieves around 140 lumens per watt, making it very bright and highly efficient. By comparison, conventional lightbulbs and high-end LEDs get around 15 and 70 lumens per watt, respectively. “A key advantage is that the energy is driven into the bulb without any electrodes, so you don’t need any electrical connections to get the energy into the bulb,” Luxim CEO Tony McGettigan explained to ZDNet. Luxim is using different versions of its electrode-less plasma technology to develop lighting for ultra-bright projection displays, retail and street lighting, microscope lighting, and various medical applications.More information: Luxim.com via: ZDNetlast_img read more

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Shocking Environmental chemistry affects ferroelectric film polarity the same way electric voltage

first_img “Normally,” Stephenson continues, “voltage is applied to change the internal structure in ferroelectric materials. You can turn the crystal upside down from the internal point of view. We have shown, I think for the first time, that this can also be done chemically by changing the chemistry of the environment.” The results of the work, which includes scientists from Northern Illinois University and the University of Pennsylvania as well as Argonne, can be found in Physical Review Letters: “Reversible Chemical Switching of a Ferroelectric Film.”In order to test the process of chemical switching by changing the environment of the ferroelectric film, Stephenson and his colleagues varied the oxygen partial pressure. In situ x-ray scattering was used to “see” the changes in the polarization of the material. The specific ferroelectric material used for the experiment was lead titanate (PbTiO3). The group found that changing the oxygen pressure switched the polarization of the PbTiO3 film in much the same way as the conventional practice of using electrodes and voltage.The use of x-rays is important, since it allows scientists a peek at what is actually happening inside these materials. “The challenge has been to measure what is going on,” Stephenson admits. “With these thin films, external voltage measurements become more ambiguous. With our x-ray technique, we are able to watch the atomic-scale structure inside these systems.”“Up until now,” he continues, “we didn’t really think that the environment these ferroelectric materials were in could be just as important as the voltage applied. Fundamentally, we didn’t realize that extra oxygen or missing oxygen at the surface could produce an electric field big enough to affect properties.”This knowledge will become more important, Stephenson explains, as the demand for smaller devices made from new materials increases. Infrared and terahertz technology, controllable catalysts and chemistry applications on chips represent some of the areas that might benefit from a better knowledge of how switching works with PbTiO3 films. “Already there are ferroelectric materials used for non-volatile computer memory devices,” Stephenson points out. “But the holy grail of these is a memory element the size of an atom. As films get thinner, understanding the interfacial properties of these materials makes a difference. If the chemistry of the environment can change the polarization, we need to harness this to create new types of devices.”“The big picture is that we are trying to create new functional materials with interesting properties. We want to understand the way interfaces between different materials work. Ferroelectrics provide a model system where we can produce and measure large effects of the electric fields from the interfaces.”Additional information: Wang, et. al. “Reversible Chemical Switching of a Ferroelectric Film.” Physical Review Letters (2008). Available online: link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevLett.102.047601 Copyright 2009 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. SLAC makes ‘electron camera,’ a world-class tool for ultrafast science, available to scientists worldwide Citation: Shocking: Environmental chemistry affects ferroelectric film polarity the same way electric voltage does (2009, February 2) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-02-environmental-chemistry-affects-ferroelectric-polarity.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img (PhysOrg.com) — “Ferroelectric materials are interesting scientifically, and, while they are used for some things now, they are potentially useful for even more applications in the future,” Brian Stephenson tells PhysOrg.com. Stephenson is a scientist at Argonne National Laboratory in Argonne, Illinois. He has been working on a project to study chemical switching in a ferroelectric film. Explore furtherlast_img read more

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Physicists create sonic black hole in the lab

first_img(PhysOrg.com) — Black holes get their name because they absorb all incoming light, and are so dense that none of that light can escape their event horizon. In a new study, scientists have created a sonic analogue of a black hole in the lab – that is, a sonic black hole in which sound waves rather than light waves are absorbed and cannot escape. The scientists hope that the short-lived sonic black hole could allow them to observe and study the elusive Hawking radiation that is predicted to be emitted by traditional black holes, which has so far been a very difficult task. Simulating black hole radiation with lasers More information: Oren Lahav, et al. “Realization of a Sonic Black Hole Analog in a Bose-Einstein Condensate.” Physical Review Letters 105, 240401 (2010). DOI:10.1103/PhysRevLett.105240401 The scientists, Oren Lahav and coauthors from the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa, Israel, have published their study on the sonic black hole in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.The researchers created the sonic black hole in a Bose-Einstein condensate made of 100,000 rubidium atoms slowed to their lowest quantum state in a magnetic trap. This cold cluster of atoms acts like a single, large quantum mechanical object. In order to transform this condensate into a sonic black hole, the scientists had to find a way to accelerate some of the condensate to supersonic speeds so that the condensate would contain some regions of supersonic flow and some regions of subsonic flow. The scientists achieved this acceleration by shining a large-diameter laser on the condensate in such a way as to create a steplike potential and a harmonic potential. When the condensate crosses the “step” in the steplike potential, the condensate accelerates to supersonic speeds. The scientists demonstrated that the condensate could accelerate to more than an order of magnitude faster than the speed of sound.“The greatest significance of our article is that we succeeded in overcoming the Landau critical velocity, which states that flow cannot exceed the speed of sound,” coauthor Jeff Steinhauer of the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology told PhysOrg.com. “Our experiment exceeds this limit for a finite period of time.”In this setup, the step marks the boundary between the supersonic and subsonic regions, which acts as the black hole’s event horizon. At this event horizon, the flow velocity of the condensate is exactly equal to the speed of sound. On the supersonic side of the step, the density of the condensate is much lower than that on the subsonic side. As the scientists explained, the low density corresponds to a higher flow velocity due to conservation of mass. In their experiments, they could maintain the black hole event horizon for at least 20 milliseconds before it became unstable.Similar to how a black hole traps photons, the supersonic region of the sonic black hole can trap phonons and a wide range of other Bogoliubov excitations with a wavelength of between 1.6 and 18 micrometers. Excitations with very short wavelengths can escape, and those with longer wavelengths cannot fit in the supersonic region in the first place. In the future, the scientists plan to use the sonic black hole to study Hawking radiation. As the physicist Stephen Hawking first predicted, black holes may emit a small amount of thermal radiation due to quantum effects. Losing this radiation can cause black holes to shrink and eventually evaporate completely. But so far, detecting this radiation has been very challenging.In order to observe Hawking radiation in the case of the sonic black hole, there are a few requirements, such as that the trapped excitations must have negative energy. The researchers verified this in simulations: When focusing two laser beams with slightly different frequencies onto the supersonic region of the condensate, the simulated condensate absorbed a photon from one beam and emitted a photon into the second beam, creating an excitation with negative energy. In the future, the sonic black hole may give scientists a glimpse of Hawking radiation. Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Copyright 2010 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Citation: Physicists create sonic black hole in the lab (2011, January 10) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-01-physicists-sonic-black-hole-lab.html An absorption image of a sonic black hole created in the lab. Image credit: Oren Lahav, et al. ©2010 The American Physical Society.last_img read more

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Klekowskii penguin takes size title away from emperor

first_img Argentine experts find giant penguin fossils in Antarctica Palaeeudyptes klekowskii. Credit: Geobios, doi:10.1016/j.geobios.2014.03.003 More information: — New giant penguin bones from Antarctica: Systematic and paleobiological significance, Comptes Rendus Palevol, In Press, www.sciencedirect.com/science/ … ii/S163106831400058X— Palaeeudyptes klekowskii, the best-preserved penguin skeleton from the Eocene–Oligocene of Antarctica: Taxonomic and evolutionary remarks, Geobios, www.sciencedirect.com/science/ … ii/S0016699514000291 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. A new fossil discovery of bones makes the 90-pound emperor penguin, thought to be the largest of all penguins, rather puny. Penguin-watching has become all the more fascinating in light of new observations from researchers about the penguin past. RT called its headline The Big Kiekowskii, and New Scientist referred to the mega-penguin. They were talking about the study that presents newly unearthed fossils. The title of their study is “New giant penguin bones from Antarctica: Systematic and paleobiological significance,” by Dr Carolina Acosta Hospitaleche and Marcelo Reguero. Antarctica was once home to the biggest species of penguin, ever—they were around 37 to 40 million years ago. Fossil deposits were excavated on Seymour Island, off the Antarctic peninsula. The researchers reckoned that this penguin was over six feet (2 meters) and weighed over 250 pounds (115 kilograms).The species is known as Palaeeudyptes klekowskii. How did these researchers know the penguin was so huge? They knew by way of the bones they discovered, indicating the penguin was the tallest and heaviest ever to walk the Earth. Detailing Acosta Hospitaleche’s work, New Scientist said, “Now she has uncovered two bigger bones. One is part of a wing, and the other is a tarsometatarsus, formed by the fusion of ankle and foot bones. The tarsometatarsus measures a record 9.1 centimeters. Based on the relative sizes of bones in penguin skeletons, Acosta Hospitaleche estimates P. klekowskii was 2.01 meters long from beak tip to toes.”The larger the penguin, the deeper it can dive. Also, the large the penguin, the longer it can remain underwater. The researchers reckoned this heavyweight P. klekowskii could have stayed down for 40 minutes, which indicates it was able to enjoy more time to hunt fish,Seymour Island is in the chain of islands around the tip of the Graham Land on the Antarctic Peninsula. Many fossils have been discovered on the island. According to The Guardian, the bones were found at the La Meseta formation, Seymour Island, which is part of the peninsula with a wide range and abundance of penguin bones. New Scientist noted that “This was a warmer region 40 million years ago, with a climate like that of present-day Tierra del Fuego, the islands at the southern tip of South America.” According to Acosta Hospitaleche, added New Scientist, this was “a wonderful time for penguins, when 10 to 14 species lived together along the Antarctic coast.” © 2014 Phys.org Citation: Klekowskii penguin takes size title away from emperor (2014, August 4) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-08-klekowskii-penguin-size-title-emperor.html Explore furtherlast_img read more

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Best of Last Week – Quantum physics got less complicated the pseudogap

first_img Explore further Last week also saw India launch its biggest rocket ever into space, paving the way for manned missions and establishing the country as a major player in the space race. Also making headlines, Curiosity rover found active, ancient organic chemistry on Mars in the form of high levels of methane in the atmosphere around it and other chemicals in rock samples nearby, sparking interest in its source.Also in a bit of interesting research, a team at the University of Utah announced that they’d come up with a “Darwinian” test that uncovers an antidepressant’s hidden toxicity—they believe their new approach might help prevent some drugs being passed as safe which later are found to have harmful side effects and is based on using untamed house mice as subjects rather than bred test mice. And a professor with Rutgers made a strong case suggesting that thermoelectric power plants could offer economically competitive renewable energy—Liping Liu thinks it’s time countries in the tropics start taking advantage of the huge temperature difference of ocean water near the surface and at depth. He claims it represents a vast untapped resource and that countries near such sources should start working on ways to harness the energy potential it offers.And finally for those people who still want to live a really long time, some researchers are wondering if ibuprofen might be an anti-aging medicine. Recent research has shown that the popular over-the counter drug could extend the lifespan of yeast, worms and flies—it also allowed them to remain healthier as they aged. Is the Higgs boson a piece of the matter-antimatter puzzle? © 2014 Phys.org Quantum physics says that particles can behave like waves, and vice versa. Researchers have now shown that this ‘wave-particle duality’ is simply the quantum uncertainty principle in disguise. Credit: Timothy Yeo / CQT, National University of Singaporecenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org)—It was an interesting week for findings in the physics world as one team of researchers made quantum physics less complicated by demonstrating that two features of the quantum world are actually the same thing—turns out that wave-particle duality is actually a disguised version of the uncertainty principle. Meanwhile, another team wondered if the Higgs boson was a piece of the matter-antimatter puzzle. They think the recently found particle might actually play a role in the apparent imbalance between matter and antimatter in the universe and want to design and run experiments at LHC to look into the possibility. Also, another team found the first direct evidence of a mysterious phase of matter that competes with high-temperature superconductivity—they’re calling it the “pseudogap,” and think it might be robbing superconcuctors of electrons preventing 100 percent efficiencies. Citation: Best of Last Week – Quantum physics got less complicated, the pseudogap and ibuprofen as an anti-aging drug (2014, December 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-12-week-quantum-physics-complicated-pseudogap.htmllast_img read more

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Is Jeet Thayil all set for another feather in his cap

first_imgIt’s that time of the year again. Commonwealth Book and Short Story Prizes has announced it’s 21 shortlisted authors. Six Indian writers feature in the shortlist for the 2013 Commonwealth. And not surprisingly, Jeet Thayil has stormed in with his  much talked about Narcopolis.Apart from Thayil, Jerry Pinto (Em and the Big Hoom), Nilanjana Roy (The Wildings), Mishi Saran (The Other Side of Light) and Farhad Sorabjee (God on Every Wind).For the Commonwealth Short Story Prize, Anushka Jasraj’s Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Notes from the Ruins is among the 19 works shortlisted.The Commonwealth Book Prize is awarded for the best first novel, and the Commonwealth Short Story Prize for the best piece of unpublished short fiction.Political, religious and social conflict runs through many of this year’s shortlisted entries, but there are also humorous stories, stories of hope, and stories full of imagination and power.The entries from 54 countries are judged within the five regions of Africa, Asia, Canada and Europe, the Caribbean and the Pacific, each of which will produce a regional winner for the two prizes. These will be announced on 14 May. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe final winners will be announced at the Hay Festival on 31 May.Commenting on the shortlisted entries, chair of the Commonwealth Short Story Prize, BBC journalist Razia Iqbal, said, ‘People often assume short stories are easier to write because they’re, well, short! But it takes a particular skill to establish mood, character and tone in quick strokes, and tell a story which leaves a lasting impression. These stories open windows on worlds which seem familiar but, through fiction, which is tightly written, reflect those worlds, in richer and more surprising colours.’ Chair of the Commonwealth Book Prize, Godfrey Smith, said, ‘Our five judges did an admirable job of shortlisting from a bountiful harvest of debut novels, based on originality, linguistic flair, depth, quality of writing and freshness of tone. A number of books boldly pushed the boundaries of form and explosively rebelled against the conventional structures of fiction-writing, inspiring lively and passionate debates among the judges.’last_img read more

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Believe none of what you hear

first_imgAll Western names! Irony being we Indians have a richer folklore than the West. But I’m wrong. Faraz Kazi is here with The Other Side who quenched the thirst of many readers of this genre.After writing a love story he has attempted horror. He says,‘I seriously don’t think changing genres proves anything. I write for myself and not for the market and I’m comfortable writing in any genre under various themes of tragedy, comedy, fear. I would rather prefer not being tagged as a genre-specific writer.’ Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’All the stories have an Indian connect. Kazi tells us ‘the book is a tribute to the culture and folklore of my land.’ Two are a must read: Dream Girl and Possession. He believes any ghost story collection is incomplete without touching upon the idea of possession, the merging of a secondary spirit with a human soul. Kazi wanted to retain  a strain of innocence in the story, hence the protagonist is a child and through her we see the world of the unknown and soon see her family also getting involved. Perhaps there is a hidden story of possession in every neighbourhood and readers can make the connection, irrespective of  their believers or sceptics. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixAs he elaborates  on Dream Girl, Kazi quips, ‘It was a strong subject and it is easily the most graphic story of the lot. Thank god, books don’t have much censorship issues because I wanted this story to come out in its crude form and shock the readers. Simply through the psyche and thought process of one single man who vows to ‘create’ his dream girl by cutting and stitching together the body parts of other girls, I tried to understand our deepest recesses.’He’s also a genre-hopper, evidently. After writing a love story and a horror fiction, now he is working on his dream project,  another collection of stories that involves the coming of age story of a woman! We aren’t scared.last_img read more

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Gear it up

first_imgAll the kiddies stay the same as the kids-centric exhibition in India, the Krackerjack Karnival is now in its third year and is up with the spring edition. The kids festival will infuse new energy and vigor than its previous edition.The idea behind the festival is to give families an opportunity to get set for summer where they can plan their holidays, camps, classes etc. 60 booths will be displaying the latest and greatest products and services in the kids space ranging from schools, fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG), apparels, furniture, holiday destinations and lots more. The carnival will also include the popular characters like Mighty Raju, Chota Bheem, Chamki from Gali gali Sim Sim and Bade Chote. Promotion of upcoming children’s movies, performance of special character from the movie Mighty Raju Rio Calling, interactive and interesting scientific shows for kids like Robotics by Vardhaman (Brainy toys), Magic Show by Rahul/Sumit Kharbanda, Sound of music play by Stage Coach, Dance workshop (Tentative Dance worx, Shiamak Davar Institute), arts and crafts by Itsy Bitsy, will also treat the visitors.Chandrika Behl, organiser of the festival said, ‘The idea is to make available this brilliant festival at different places and each time a new precedent is set by bringing something novel and extraordinary to the forefront’. Seeing the incredible response Krackerjack Karnival has been receiving from visitors, exhibitors and participants, the organisers are planning to launch a series of events at different locations within this year itself – the first of which is scheduled to take place in Gurgaon in April.last_img read more

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Befriending music

first_imgGet set for an evening full of different genres of music. Teamwork is back with Friends Of Music (FOM), a series of musical get together. It is an initiative to revive the culture of enjoying a classic cocktail of good food and great music under moonlit evening with friends and family. Spend an evening with some old school blues, funky rhythm and blues, and soulful jazz music. Backed by rusty stringed guitars and harps, soothing saxophones and melodies that you will never forget.  The young and talented Dhruv Vishwanath, Soul’d Out, and Big Bang  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Blues wil entertain the audience with their performances. Visvanath is a multi-talented musician who began his musical journey at the age of eight. His percussive acoustic style is unique to the Indian subcontinent. He has pioneered a new style of playing guitar and has brought the genre to the forefront.  He continues to write and compose music that communicates with the emotions of people. Lovingly known as Guitar Spanker,  he uses the body of the guitar like a drum and sings simultaneously. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixBig Bang Blues, influenced by genres of blues, rhythm and jazz, funk and rock, BBB brings a wide repertoire of music to the stage. The band drives its inspiration from the influences brought in together by its members who come from different backgrounds.Soul’d Out, whose music ranges over different genres aren’t really concerned about how its music is defined or categorised. All that matters to them is they have fun playing, which eventually entertains the audience.When: 25 April Where: Lodi- The Garden Restaurant Timing: 7.30 pm Ticket Price: Rs 350last_img read more

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