Celebrities Launch I Love A Bit Of Variety TShirts

first_imgVariety – The Children’s Charity, today announced that national treasure, Barbara Windsor, will launch the ‘I Love A Bit of Variety’ T-shirt campaign.Former Carry On actress Barbara Windsor launches the I Love A Bit of Variety celebrity T-shirt campaignThe actress, who was presented with the Variety ‘Lifetime Achievement’ award at the charity’s 2010 Showbiz Awards at the Grovesnor House Hotel, has been a Celebrity Ambassador of the charity for more than 30 yearsFrom today, the public can buy the ‘I Love A Bit of Variety’ T-shirts from www.variety.org.uk/love. This will raise funds to support thousands of sick, disabled and disadvantaged children across the UK who are supported by Variety. The T-shirt, which is available for £12 and comes in a range of styles and sizes, has been modeled by a host of celebrities who are supporting the campaign.So far, these include Leigh Francis aka Keith Lemon, Kimberley Walsh, Warren Brown, Kate Thornton, Warwick Davis, Aldo Zilli, Gaby Roslin, Michelle Collins, Hugo Speer, Jon Culshaw, Larry Lamb, David Morrissey, Eamonn Holmes, Ruth Langsford, Kian Egan, Nina Conti, Hayley Tamaddon, Alesha Dixon, Matt Johnson, Julie Graham, Joe McGann, Claire King, Anna Williamson, Terry Mynott, Heather Small, Billy Murray, Bobby Davro, Tamzin Outhwaite, Neil Stuke, Kristina Rihanoff, Vic Reeves and Nancy Sorrell.Barbara said of her new role: ’I’m always honoured to represent Variety, the Children’s Charity, and to support the incredible work it does across the country. The welfare of our sick, disabled or disadvantaged young people should be top of every agenda, and I’ll be wearing my ‘I Love A Bit of Variety’ T-shirt with real pride.’Variety Chief Barker Jason Lewis said: “Variety has a rich heritage of support from the showbusiness community and so it is only right that we continue to move forward and work with the stars of today. Over the years, Barbara has often dedicated her time to the charity and we know that, with her support alongside our other celebrities, we can mobilise even more people around the country to help Variety to improve the lives of children and young people who are less fortunate than others.”Variety, the Children’s Charity, is dedicated to supporting children and young people across the UK who are sick, disabled or disadvantaged, facilitating positive experiences for them through its wide range of programmes and initiatives. Since setting up its UK division in 1949, the charity has raised over £200 million and supported more than 800,000 children.The former “Carry On” star joins a long line of illustrious celebrities who have supported Variety since its inception. The charity has its roots in the showbiz industry and Sir Michael Caine, James McAvoy, Steven Frayne aka Dynamo, Dame Judi Dench and Dame Joan Collins are just some of the many stars who have pledged their backing in previous years and helped contribute towards Variety’s rich entertainment heritage.To find out more about Variety, the Children’s Charity, or to donate to its various projects, please visit www.variety.org.uk.last_img read more

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Your Chance To Meet Shania Twain During Her Tour

first_imgHere’s your chance to bid on the ultimate Shania Twain meet and greet package, and help a good cause.The singer is putting a package under the hammer that includes concert tickets to the venue of your choice during her Shania Now Tour, as well as airfares and hotel for two. And, of course, the chance to meet Shania herself.Proceeds from the auction benefit Point Hope. Point Hope’s mission is to raise awareness and champion the cause for forgotten children so that: Every child has a loving and nurturing environment; every child has the basic essentials to live a healthy life; local communities are equipped to deal with the challenges facing children; government, business, education and religious communities are encouraged to partner for the welfare of children. The staff of Point Hope are dedicated individuals who work diligently to help others that are in need, providing hope and care in the form of programs, individual attention and the creation of self-sustainable programs that benefit families and persons worldwide.“It’s unacceptable for us to stand by and watch any child in this modern society suffer right before our eyes when there is something we CAN do about it,” said Shania.To find out more about the auction, click here.last_img read more

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From Smurf to Strat actor is all revved up for Bat Out

first_imgAdvertisement In one serendipitous afternoon, Andrew Polec went from hoping to play a Smurf in a musical version of the kids’ show to landing the role of rocker/revolutionary Strat in Bat Out of Hell.“As ridiculous as it sounds, I had on a SpongeBob belt and bright blue pants and a bright blue shirt and I even had a SpongeBob backpack,” Polec recalled. And, oh yes, a large red floor tom drum.A fellow would-be Smurf mentioned the “open call” audition a few blocks away for the rock musical and the starving young actor/musician hoping to make it big in New York City, with drum in tow, decided to take a chance. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement “I made it up to the audition room and everyone was in leather jackets and spiky belts and chains and here I was in my SpongeBob outfit. So I felt totally out of place with my big red drum. The casting director looked at me like I was a nut,” Polec said.READ MORE Facebookcenter_img Advertisement Login/Register With: Twitter Actor Andrew Polec plays Start in Bat Out of Hell at the Ed Mirvish Theatre. (Andrew Francis Wallace/Toronto Star)last_img read more

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THE UNLIKELY RISE OF SCHITTS CREEK

first_imgSchitt’s Creek is a Peak TV rarity: Instead of steadily shrinking over time, the Canadian-produced comedy from co-creators/stars Eugene and Dan Levy has actually gotten bigger with age. Since launching on cable’s Pop network in 2015, the show has seen its linear ratings more than double and its overall audience soar past 3 million viewers. Word of mouth around the series has also exploded, fueled by critical acclaim and a 2017 deal which put past seasons of the show on Netflix. But Schitt’s didn’t just happen overnight. It’s been a slow-rolling success, blowing up at a point in its run when most other shows would just be starting to wind down. Ahead of Wednesday’s season-five premiere on Pop, Vulture called up the Levys, as well as execs at two of their network partners, for the inside story on just how the Rose family blossomed into an American beauty.TV history is filled with examples of great shows gone too soon because they ended up in the wrong home. Freaks and Geeks, for example, might have lasted more than one season had it had been bought by the young-skewing WB Network instead of NBC. The Levys were well aware of this when they were pitching their idea for Schitt’s Creek to both American and Canadian networks in 2014. The duo envisioned their show as a series that would be “a bit niche, to say the least,” as the younger Levy puts it. (In case you’ve missed out on Schitt’s mania, the show imagines what would happen if a superrich family of socialite royalty — think the Kardashians — suddenly found themselves nearly penniless and living out of a motel room in the middle of nowhere.) While the elder Levy says he and son “kind of knew this was not gonna be a network show,” they took it to some broadcast outlets in both countries anyway. A meeting at one such outlet here — Eugene Levy thinks it was ABC — went well: “[They] seemed to react very positively to it,” he says. “I remember one executive saying, ‘We can’t wait to get our hands on this.’” This did not make Levy happy, however. “I remember hearing that and kinda feeling a little nervous,” he says, alluding to broadcast TV’s historic penchant for micromanaging showrunners. The father and son also pitched some major American cable networks, but with less success. “HBO and Showtime did not respond to it,” Eugene Levy says.The response was much warmer when the duo took the show to a leading broadcast network in their home country, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. The CBC, like ABC in America, is a somewhat broad-skewing, over-the-air broadcast network. That might have ruled them out as a potential home, given the Levys desire to go somewhere more amenable to a “niche” idea. But right around the time the Levys were pitching Schitt’s Creek, the Canadian TV powerhouse was undergoing a bit of a metamorphosis in its comedy development philosophy. “In 2014, we made a decision to prioritize half-hour, single-camera comedies with a unique point of view and authentic, character-driven storytelling,” says Sally Catto, general manager for programming at CBC. Or, as Eugene Levy puts it, “They were heading in more of a cable direction for their comedies. The timing was right.” The CBC was very interested in Schitt’s Creek, both because they liked its off-center sensibility and because Eugene Levy and co-star Catherine O’Hara are comedic royalty in Canada. The Levys agreed to sell it to the CBC, which underscored its commitment to the program by renewing it for a second season even before the first episode aired. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Advertisement Facebookcenter_img Login/Register With: Twitter Advertisementlast_img read more

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Iqaluit shaken by discovery of four bodies

first_img(Iqaluit RCMP discovered three bodies in this house Tuesday after finding a man dead from a self-inflicted shotgun blast in a cemetery. APTN/Photo)By Kent DriscollAPTN National NewsIQALUIT-Iqaluit residents are reeling after RCMP discovered four bodies Tuesday, triggering the cancellation of classes at the local elementary school, according to the city’s mayor.Iqaluit Mayor Madeleine Redfern said residents were “shaken” by the discovery of one body in the cemetery and three more in a home.“This has really shaken our community,” said Redfern, in a statement. “We need to come together and help each other pull through this.Police said the first body found in the cemetery was of a man who appeared to have been killed by a self-inflicted shotgun blast to the face.Three other bodies were later discovered in his home by police.Four people lived in the home, including a common-law couple and their young daughters, a toddler and a student at Joamie Elementary School.APTN National News has chosen not to publish the identities of the victims, which are known. The RCMP said officers are still trying to reach all next-of-kin.RCMP officer were seen canvassing the neighbourhood near the residence Tuesday night.People living near the cemetery reported an unoccupied truck at in the early afternoon which was eventually shut off by a local resident at about 3 p.m.Redfern said the news of the deaths left residents in “shock” and disbelief.Redfern said she would be seeking to get crisis intervention to deal with the trauma that has impacted many people.“Many people, including family and friends of the victims, emergency responders and community members need immediate counselling,” said Redfern. “At the same time this territory must work together to end the root causes of our problems.”kdriscoll@aptn.calast_img read more

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Tracing a Cree womans last steps before her mysterious Toronto condo death

first_imgJorge Barrera and Kenneth Jackson APTN National News TORONTO–One can see Lake Ontario from the condo’s balcony where Bella Laboucan-McLean fell to her death in the early morning hours of July 20, 2013.High up on the 31st floor, the lake dominates the horizon through the floor-to-ceiling windows surrounding the small condo’s living room and kitchen.The balcony is visible and merely 12 paces away from the front door. Two smaller paces through the balcony’s glass doors brings you to the edge where the young Cree woman fell to her death from unit 3109 at 21 Iceboat Terrace.There was a party in the two bedroom condo, yet no one saw her fall.Her death remains a mystery. She was 25.Bella Laboucan-McLean. Photo courtesy of family.Toronto police detectives interviewed the five people who were in the condo the night Laboucan-McLean died. All said they didn’t see her fall.A man from the condo called in a missing persons report on Laboucan-McLean 12 hours after police found her body.She left her phone, shoes and purse in the condo.The file remained in the hands of general detectives with Toronto’s 14 Division Criminal Investigation Bureau over the past year. While homicide detectives have advised them on the case, it was never classified as a murder and is being treated as a suspicious death.APTN National News has now learned the investigation is nearing its end.Laboucan-McLean’s family fears investigators will close the case without answering any of their burning questions.“Right now I’m feeling pretty upset, there have been a lot of tears,” said Laboucan-McLean’s sister Melina Laboucan-Massimo. “I am feeling pretty frustrated with the progress of the case.”On Wednesday afternoon, a real estate agent gave APTN National News a tour of the unit which is up for sale.An APTN National News reporter viewed the small condo under the guise he and his wife were looking for a new place in Toronto.The view from inside the condo. Lake Ontario on the horizon, balcony off to the right. Kenneth Jackson/APTNThe balcony. Kenneth Jackson/APTNOnce through the door, two bedrooms and a nicely decorated bathrooms are off to the right. The rest of the condo is made up of the living area and the kitchenAs for the balcony, it couldn’t fit more than three people. Even two may find it uncomfortable. It’s shaped like triangle and is no more than five paces at its longest points.How no one could have noticed her fall given the small size of the condo remains part of the mystery.Investigators believe the party was still going at 5 a.m., which is about the time of Laboucan-McLean’s death.“It just doesn’t add up, it doesn’t make sense,” said Laboucan-Massimo. “Just the fact the people that were there at the time didn’t find it necessary to call the police at the time of her death makes it very suspect still.”Laboucan-Massimo said her sister would not have jumped on her own.“She enjoyed her life very much. She was an extrovert and had friends,” she said. “She was also a homebody who had a strong family.”Melina Laboucan-Massimo holds a piece of Bella Laboucan-McLean’s beaded artwork. Photo courtesy of family.Toronto police detectives have been unable to solve the mystery. They have interviewed all who were present in the condo that night and sifted through cell phone records, searching for a clue. So far, they have come up empty.Antony Rankine, a Toronto hip hop artist known as Scandalis, told APTN National News in a previous interview that no one in the condo realized she was gone until they woke up later in the day.“The truth has been told already,” said Rankine. “None of us knew she fell until we woke up next day. The police have all this information.”Now, with the anniversary of Laboucan-McLean’s death approaching, her family continues to find closure elusive.“It just impacted our family so immensely,” said Laboucan-Massimo.Laboucan-McLean’s story was featured in the launch of a community-led online database of murdered and missing Indigenous women across the country. The website, which is the result of work by No More Silence, Families of Sisters in Spirit and the Native Youth Sexual Health Network, was unveiled Wednesday and featured Laboucan-McLean’s case prominently.“This is going to be another way to commemorate Bella’s life,” said Laboucan-Massimo. “We are profiling her to encourage other families to submit information about their loved ones.”Laboucan-McLean grew up in her mother’s community of Sturgeon Lake Cree Nation in Alberta. Her father is Billy Joe Laboucan who is chief of the Lubicon Lake Band. She was a fancy dress dancer and loved the drum and song.“We would spend a lot of time together in the summer going to traditional pow wows,” said Laboucan-Massimo.She had recently graduated from Humber College’s Fashion Arts program and was planning to launch a career in the industry.Laboucan-Massimo said family and friends will be commemorating her sister’s memory out on the land at a camp northwest of Edmonton to mark the one year anniversary of her death. With Cree and Dene drummers, she said they plan to have a candle light vigil and a round dance.“It will be a good way to commemorate her passing following our customs and honouring her with song and drumming she loved so much,” said Laboucan-Massimo.She said many Cree communities hold yearly memorials for family members who have died and Laboucan-McLean’s memorial is open to others who want to share the pain of a lost loved one.“It’s not just about her death, it’s about her life,” said Laboucan-Massimo.Bella Laboucan-McLean tanning a moose hide.jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarrerakjackson@aptn.ca@afixedaddresslast_img read more

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WilsonRaybould should step down if running for Liberals former chief Art Manuel

first_imgBy Tim FontaineAPTN National NewsJody Wilson-Raybould should quit her post as an Assembly of First Nations regional chief if she wants to run for the federal Liberals, says a former British Columbia chief.“We didn’t elect her to be a candidate for the Liberal party. The respectful position is to tell the Indian people she’s going to resign her post,” said Art Manuel, a former chief of the Neskonlith First Nation in BC.Wilson-Raybould was acclaimed Thursday as the Liberal Party of Canada candidate in the new riding of Vancouver Granville.She dodged a question about the controversy by an APTN National News reporter.“I fundamentally love the role I have as regional chief and I’m committed to continuing to serve chiefs of British Columbia who put me here,” Wilson-Raybould said. “But I’m also proud to work with the Liberal team and working to move forward and think about moving into 2015.”Wilson-Raybould has said she plans to take a leave of absence from the AFN when her campaign officially kicks off in 2015 and will only resign if she’s elected.Manuel is the son of the late former national chief Arthur Manuel, who served when the AFN was called the National Indian Brotherhood. He says Wilson-Raybould’s decision to run for a political office while holding a senior AFN position is unheard of.“She was at the front line of issues, on Aboriginal rights and title, and at the same she’s courting being a part of the Canadian government and the Canadian political system,” he said. “My dad was in this. He never would have done that.”Serpent River First Nation chief Isadore Day wrote a letter to the interim national chief of the AFN calling on Raybould-Wilson to resign.“Wilson-Raybould’s legal background would suggest she understands the ethical lines being blurred by her decision to remain a paid official of the AFN,” Day wrote. “There are very obvious fears that the AFN mandate is being affected by a partisan influence and that fiscal resources are funding a formally announced candidate.”The AFN says that under the organization’s charter it’s up to BC chiefs to decide if Wilson-Raybould can run or should resign.In an email, the director of the board of the BC AFN defended Raybould-Wilson’s decision to stay on as regional chief while she runs for the Liberals.“The board has fully discussed, with Regional Chief Jody, the steps required as this process unfolds and, as a board, we have performed the due diligence required to follow the (AFN) constitution and by-laws of the organization,” wrote Chief Maureen Chapman of the Skawahlook First Nation.Chapman dismissed Day’s concerns.“While an Ontario chief is certainly entitled to their opinion, the business of the BC AFN will be handled in BC, as I expect Ontario business would be handled in Ontario,” said Chapman.Still, Art Manuel says more consultation should have been sought. Though no longer an elected official, Manuel often serves as a proxy for other First Nation chiefs at AFN meetings.“I don’t recall the Union of BC Indian Chiefs passing a resolution endorsing her to be a Liberal candidate.” Manuel said.But Manuel has a warning for Wilson-Raybould if she loses the election and returns to her post.“If she does then she’s just going to embarrass the Liberal Party of Canada because I’m going to make sure we demonstrate against her on that,” he said.Tfontaine@aptn.calast_img read more

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Aglukkaq reads newspaper while Nunavut food debate flares around her

first_img(Still image of House of Commons video showing Environment Minister Leona Aglukkaq reading a newspaper during Question Period Monday while debate raged about the Harper government’s food subsidy program for the North.)APTN National News OTTAWA–Environment Minister Leona Aglukkaq was caught on camera reading the newspaper while debate raged around her in Question Period Monday about a food crisis in Nunavut.Aglukkaq has said she is considering legal action against Rankin Inlet’s deputy mayor Sam Tutanuak who claimed the minister tried to extract an apology during a phone conversation with the Nunavut hamlet’s senior administrative officer.Aglukkaq has flatly denied she tried to get an apology for Tutanuak’s comments to APTN Investigates that high grocery prices in the community had forced people to scavenge for food at the local dump.Aglukkaq’s office also denied claims from five different MPs that she yelled ‘that’s not true’ during Question Period last week when the NDP brought up the issue of Inuit searching for food in the dump.The Auditor General of Canada released a scathing report last Monday on the management of the Harper government’s food subsidy Nutrition North program. Auditor General Michael Ferguson said Ottawa had no idea whether the program was working or if Northern grocery retailers were passing on the government subsidy for perishable foods like vegetables.The NDP again pressed Aglukkaq on the issue in Question Period Monday, with NDP Opposition Leader Tom Mulcair using his final question to hammer the Nunavut MP on the issue.“We all heard her shameful response when she heard about people scavenging out of a landfill in her own riding. She shouted from her seat that it was not true. Now she is suing local authorities in Rankin Inlet for daring to say that it is,” said Mulcair. “Let us look at that style of crisis management: deny the truth, then deny that she is denying the truth, then personally attack the leaders who dare tell the truth. Will she apologize today to the people of Rankin Inlet for disrespect, her threats and her dishonesty?”House of Commons Speaker Andrew Scheer intervened because Mulcair used the word “dishonesty” which is deemed “unparliamentarily language.” Yet, Scheer still gave Aglukkaq the option to respond, but she took a pass.Cree NDP MP Romeo Saganash then took up the issue in the second round of NDP questions.“We are facing a real food crisis in the North as a result of the failure of the Conservative’s Nutrition North program,” said Saganash. “Instead of helping them, their own MP threatens a warning. It is shameful. Is the minister going to drop this attempt of legal bullying and help them, at least?”Aglukkaq responded saying, “those allegations are completely false.” She then accused the NDP of voting against investments in the North, including a highway from Inuvik to Tuktoyaktuk in neighbouring Northwest Territories.“That party continues to vote against those kinds of investments on a regular basis,” said Aglukkaq.Then Saganash, with a rare display of fire, said Aglukkaq had nothing to teach him about the North.“My record of my last 30 years in the North is quite brighter than hers. I have no lessons to take from the minister,” said Saganash.Aboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt then stepped in to respond to Saganash. Aglukkaq picked up a newspaper and started to read as the debate raged.Valcourt handled two more questions from NDP Aboriginal affairs critic Jean Crowder.Aglukkaq did put down the newspaper to respond to a question later from Liberal Aboriginal affairs critic Carolyn Bennett.“Recent footage of residents in Rankin Inlet scavenging for food at the dump did not prompt the environment minister, their MP, to acknowledge the problem. Instead, she savagely attacked the community’s deputy mayor for pointing it out,” said Bennett. “Rather than suing community leaders, will the current government finally deal with the reality that people in Northern Canada cannot afford to feed their families?”Aglukkaq said Bennett was making things up.“Those allegations are completely false. If that member has any evidence of that, I would encourage her to produce that evidence so that I can deal with it in the House. However, they are absolutely false,” said Aglukkaq. “No one knew for 30 years there was even a food subsidy going to the North. It was a Liberal decision to have the program fund an airline. The people in the North were the first—the last thing on their minds, was to subsidize an airline and to subsidize a community in Quebec, Val-d’Or.”news@aptn.ca‎@APTNNewslast_img read more

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Attawapiskat youth to spend time on the land with Junior Canadian Rangers

first_imgAnnette Francis APTN National NewsAround this time of the year young people in Attawapiskat have two options.Head out on the yearly goose hunt or sit at home.But this year there’s something a little different and it couldn’t come at a better time.A number of young people in Attawapiskat are getting a break from the stress that is gripping their community.Nearly three dozen signed up to spend some time in the woods with the Junior Canadian Rangers.last_img

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Former TRC chair encourages residential school survivors to save records

first_imgPhotograph of boys outside of St. Anne’s Indian Residential School in 1945. (Algoma University/Edmund Metatawabin collection.)Kathleen MartensAPTN NewsFormer residential school students are being asked to make a decision about the fate of their confidential abuse claims.They can keep, share or destroy their Independent Assessment Process (IAP) or earlier Alternate Dispute Resolution (ADS) records by filling out a form at the website Myrecordsmychoice.Murray Sinclair, former chair of the Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), hopes former students opt to preserve their personal experiences.“You can save your IAP or ADR records for history, public education and research at the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation (NCTR),” he posted on his Facebook page.“I encourage residential school survivors to do so by contacting the NCTR directly or following the links on the (website).”The new website was created by the Indian Residential Schools Adjudication Secretariat, which co-ordinated IAP claims for serious physical and sexual abuse between 2007-12.Murray Sinclair was former chief commissioner of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. (APTN file photo.)If former students do nothing their records will be destroyed on Sept. 19, 2027 – a deadline set by the Supreme Court of  Canada.“The courts were clear that IAP and ADR records are private and confidential,” Dan Shapiro, chief adjudicator of the Independent Assessment Process, said in a release.“Claimants, and no one else, control their IAP and ADR records, and they alone have the right to decide what to do with them.”Four IAP records from each claim are being kept until that date: the completed application form, the audio recording and transcript of the testimony, and the adjudicator’s decision.Former students can request their records online or by calling the Secretariat toll-free at 1-877-635-2648.The Secretariat said more than 38,000 former students submitted claims to the IAP.It said 99 per cent of those claims have been resolved, with remaining claims expected to be wrapped up by 2020.The IAP was established under the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, the largest class-action settlement in Canadian history. The ADR was the predecessor of the IAP.Meanwhile, the NCTR is located at the University of Manitoba.It already contains millions of records about residential schools, including statements from former students and other records gathered by the TRC, historical documents, and information about former students and staff.last_img read more

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Next Alberta action on Trans Mountain could be in coming days

first_imgWe could find out this week what the Alberta government’s next move is in the ongoing battle against British Columbia regarding the Trans Mountain pipeline.Environment Minister Shannon Phillips was asked Monday about Premier Rachel Notley’s timetable.“Certainly cabinet is examining a range of options, and the Government of Alberta will have more to say about that in the coming days,” she said.Last week, Notley announced her government would be suspending all electricity talks with B.C. after that province’s government said it would temporarily restrict increases in diluted bitumen shipments, putting Trans Mountain into jeopardy.While the wait is on for that next action, Energy Minister Marg McCuaig-Boyd said there has to be some middle ground with her provincial counterparts.“Whether they say it publicly or just meet with us and tell us what they’re thinking,” she said. “They probably do have something in mind — they’re just not saying it.”She said Alberta is trying to present a winning argument for both sides.“We’re not going to quit on this; it’s too important,” she said.Several experts have already questioned the impact of the electricity threat.“You’re not talking about much in the grand scheme of things; it’s not much of a weapon,” energy consultant David Gray told the Canadian Press.Blake Shaffer with the C.D. Howe Institute also told the CP that for B.C. to lose potentially up to $500 million a year on the sale of extra power, that would mean high assumptions.“That would assume that that space were used to the fullest amount every single hour of the year, at a very high price,” Shaffer explained. “They do have another opportunity in California, so I don’t know there’s going to be a true limiting of market access if that’s the intention.”Shaffer said it could backfire with higher rates, due to less competition to seel their power.But the Alberta NDP has often said they’re looking at multiple options, and Phillips reiterated Notley’s previous comments that the federal government has to do more, despite already coming out in defense of the project.“To be very specific that this proposal by the province of British Columbia, is in fact, outside their jurisdiction,” she said.PHILLIPS ON FORMER OIL SANDS ADVISORPhillps also responded to comments made by one of the former co-chairs of the province’s Oil Sands Advisory Group.When asked about Tzeporah Berman – long criticized by the opposition for being on the panel in the first place – saying the conflict is messy but necessary, Phillips was terse.“I’m not really all that concerned about anything that Tzeporah Berman says,” she said. “Tzeporah was a very integral part of the new concensus that came up around oil sands companies finding ways out of the dead end that previous governments had driven us into.“Having said that, I think she’s wrong on this issue.”last_img read more

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NS premier to tout provinces LNG projects in Europe A real opportunity

first_imgHALIFAX – Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil headed to Europe Thursday to drum up business opportunities for the province, including two proposed liquefied natural gas projects.McNeil said he will meet with officials from German energy giant E.ON to pitch Nova Scotia’s LNG potential.Two companies have proposed LNG projects in Nova Scotia — Pieridae Energy Ltd. of Calgary and Bear Head LNG Corp., a subsidiary of Australia-based Liquefied Natural Gas Ltd.“We believe there is a real opportunity for LNG plants in Nova Scotia. Germany has expressed a real interest of support around purchasing product out of those. This is my second visit in to see them,” McNeil told reporters Thursday morning.McNeil said both LNG projects are “doable.” An LNG megaproject slated for the West Coast — the $36-billion Pacific NorthWest LNG project planned for British Columbia — was scrapped last July.The premier is also going to France and England before returning June 9.McNeil said he would also meet officials from the transportation logistics sector, in a bid to expand cargo capacity at Halifax’s Stanfield international airport.“It’s really a global step for us,” he said.The premier, who was scheduled to board a WestJet inaugural direct flight from Halifax to Paris, was also to meet with officials in the financial and information sectors.last_img read more

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Barrick Gold Corp deepens ties with Chinese miner Shandong Gold Group

first_imgTORONTO – Barrick Gold Corp. says it’s deepening its ties with Shandong Gold Group Co. Ltd. and will look at partnering with the Chinese company on potential acquisitions and asset sales.The new agreement builds on a deal last year that saw the Canadian gold miner sell a 50 per cent stake in its Veladero mine in Argentina to Shandong.The companies had said earlier they would evaluate joint investment in projects currently owned by Barrick or Shandong Gold.Under the deal announced Monday, the companies will choose one of Shandong Gold’s mines where they will share technical expertise and other information to improve operations.Barrick and Shandong Gold will also improve communication between management and technical teams.Shandong is also doing an independent evaluation of a potential mining project at Lama in Argentina.Companies in this story: (TSX:ABX)last_img read more

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Five things to watch for in the Canadian business world in the

first_imgTORONTO – Five things to watch for in the Canadian business world in the coming week:Latest job numbersStatistics Canada releases the labour force survey for August on Friday. The previous survey for July found that the economy generated 54,100 net new jobs and pushed the unemployment rate back to its four-decade low of 5.8 per cent, down from six per cent the previous month.Like peas and carrotsConstellation Brands executives will speak about the company’s strategic business activities and outlook for the future at a Barclays investment conference in Boston on Wednesday. The U.S.-based alcohol giant recently announced an additional $5-billion investment in Canadian pot producer Canopy Growth, raising its share in the cannabis giant to 38 per cent.Couche-Tard earningsAlimentation Couche-Tard Inc. releases first-quarter results on Wednesday. CEO Brian Hannasch said in July that the North American convenience store giant is looking for new acquisitions following a blockbuster year that made it Canada’s largest company by revenues.Rate announcementThe Bank of Canada will make an announcement on its benchmark interest rate Wednesday. Most economists expect the central bank to keep its key interest rate target on hold, but they will scrutinize the central bank’s statement for clues about what it might do next.Transcontinental resultsTranscontinental Inc. will hold a third-quarter conference call on Thursday. The Montreal-based printing and packaging company’s second-quarter profit was up nearly 50 per cent from a year-earlier, mainly as a result of accelerated revenue from a long-term printing contract that was ended prematurely by Hearst.last_img read more

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NEB rejects Burnabys bid to stop work at Trans Mountain pipeline terminal

first_imgBURNABY, B.C. — The National Energy Board has rejected the City of Burnaby’s request that it rescind orders allowing the company building the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion to conduct work at its terminal in the city.The Metro Vancouver city had asked that the board cancel the orders after the Federal Court of Appeal quashed government approval for the expansion project.Burnaby had argued the terminal work was primarily related to the project, but the board said in a written decision Thursday that it’s upholding the orders, allowing Trans Mountain Corp. to do infrastructure work at the Burnaby Terminal.The NEB says piping modifications are not associated with the expansion project and the relocation and decommissioning orders appropriately allow Trans Mountain to optimize the site in preparation to offer new services to shippers.The board also allowed the company to continue tree clearing as part of the approved work.Burnaby has been a long-standing opponent of the pipeline expansion, which would substantially increase tanker traffic in the city’s waters, and it was among the plaintiffs in the Federal Court of Appeal case against the project.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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Alberta politicians vote unanimously to back province in oil pipeline fight

first_imgEDMONTON, A.B. – Alberta politicians have passed a motion unanimously to back Premier Rachel Notley’s fight for the Trans Mountain pipeline.The United Conservatives, Alberta Party, and Alberta Liberals joined with Notley’s NDP to back the government motion in support of the project, which would triple the amount of oil flowing from Edmonton to B.C.The final tally was 70-0, with Notley and United Conservative Opposition Leader Jason Kenney in the chamber for the vote. However, some politicians say they still have concerns with how Notley’s government is handling the battle with B.C. and dealing with Ottawa, which has jurisdiction over inter-provincial pipelines.Kenney says Notley should have kept a recently lifted ban on B.C. wine in place, and was late to coming around to embracing the possibility of cutting off oil to B.C. to force the issue.Greg Clark of the Alberta Party says Notley’s government has failed to make the case to B.C. that Alberta shares its concerns and is taking action on climate change.(THE CANADIAN PRESS)last_img read more

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