Norton still unaware of responsibility …seeking advice

first_imgGuyana Prize for LiteratureThe creation of new departments within the Government seems to be confusing the officeholders as to what is, or is not, their responsibilities. One such partly unaware Government member is Social Cohesion Minister, Dr George Norton, who despite being responsible for culture, youth and sport seems to not know whether he has the responsibility for the prestigious Guyana Prize for Literature.This publication reported that Government did not release funds, to the Guyana Prize for Literature Committee, for the hosting of the event in 2017 resulting inMinister George Nortonthem halting all work. However, Secretary to the Committee, Al Creighton, explained that they are still judging the submissions and promised the hosting of the awards ceremony later in 2018.Nevertheless, he could not have given an explanation for the event being postponed indefinitely. The prestigious award ceremony was supposed to be held in July of 2017, with March 31 being the deadline for submissions.Meanwhile a source had indicated that the Committee is uncertain as to when the awards would be held, since Government is yet to signal its commitment to funding for the event to be kicked off.Guyana Times caught up with Minister Norton on Monday at the launching of his Ministry’s Mash band, where he explained that he is yet to determine under whose remit the Guyana Prize falls. Nevertheless, he continued to deny claims that Government is withholding funds but alluded to the “financial implication” of hosting the event.“I know it was established many years ago under the stewardship of Mr (Desmond) Hoyte and it’s a legacy we would want to keep on. There is a lot of financial implications but it worth every cent and we hope (to get) at least the short list soon,” Dr Norton stated.He added that he is still awaiting a response from Creighton as to the status of the Committee’s work and who is responsible for the Guyana Prize.The Guyana Prize is awarded to writers of Guyanese nationality in several different categories. These categories include Best First Book of Poetry, Best First Book of Fiction, Best Book of Poetry, Best Book of Fiction and Best Book of Drama. Additionally, the Guyana Prize also awards Books of Poetry, Fiction and Drama in separate categories for Caribbean writers.The Guyana Prize for Literature was established in 1987 to provide encouragement for the development of good creative writing among Guyanese in particular and Caribbean writers in general. The Prize is for published books and is open to works by citizens of Caribbean countries: Caricom States, the Commonwealth Caribbean, and the Netherland Antilles.To be eligible for entry, a book must have been written and published in English and for Drama-entries must be full-length plays. For Fiction and Poetry, the publishers must enter works. No more than one work by any author may be entered in each category.Over the years, the Prize has attracted both praise and criticism and would have awarded several established writers aiding in the development of the literature sector in Guyana. The judges are pulled from both the foreign and local literary sector with vast knowledge in literature.last_img read more

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Playoff Sunday underway at Fort St. John Curling Club

first_imgIn the men’s bracket Team Sherrard takes on Team Stewart, and Team Zubot throws the rocks with Team Hansen. In the women’s bracket Team Muise plays against Team Monk, while Team Steuber battles Team Snyder. There are two other draws to be played today. At 12:30 p.m. the semi-finals take place, while the finals for both brackets will take place at 4 o’clock.- Advertisement –last_img

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EMMET RUSHE’S FITNESS COLUMN: FAST TRACK TO FAILURE?

first_imgBY EMMET RUSHE: We live in an age where everything is instant.When we want something, we want it now.High speed broadband, instant coffee, self-serve checkouts, instant downloads, instant messenger; the list goes on and on. We have become used to not having to wait for anything.Turn on YouTube to upload a video and if we have to wait longer than 10 seconds for it to load, we will lose interest and move onto another.People get frustrated if they have to queue, are stuck in traffic or get stuck behind a slow driver.When it comes to weight loss, health and fitness, the same expectations apply. We live in an age where someone is disappointed if they only lose a pound per week when on a weight loss programme.Guys who are looking to build muscle are turning to P.E.D’s so they can get to where they want to be as fast as possible.People are always looking for the quickest way to get in shape while doing the least amount of work.Diet companies promise unsustainable weight loss statistics in an attempt to attract the most customers.The problem with always looking for the quickest way to do anything, is when you finally reach your goal, you will probably go back to your starting point just as quick, if not quicker. How’s that for high speed?Goals have to be realistic.I had a conversation with a woman who wanted to lose weight for a family event that was 10 months down the road.She wanted to lose 2 stone for the event but was getting frustrated that the weight was coming off too slowly. She was ONLY losing 1lb per week.It was getting to the point where she was so frustrated that she felt like giving up.2 stone is 28lbs.There are roughly 40 weeks in 10 months.28lbs divided into 40 weeks is 0.7lbs per week.She was .3lbs a week over what she needed, which means if she kept going she would have nearly 3 stone off come the event.Yet she was ready to quit!Why??She was ready to quit because she was being influenced by was she saw and heard through the media, internet, friends and her work colleagues.They were all telling her that she should be losing more weight, faster than she was losing it so why bother trying at all?Great advice, huh?Misinformation and negativity like this makes it very hard for people when they set out on their goals.You feel as if you should always be getting there faster.You lose 5lbs the first week, so you want 10lbs the next, then 20lbs and so on.It is completely unrealistic to expect goals like this to be achieved or sustainable if they are reached.If you actually manage to reach them in this manner, it would be like bungee jumping.You start (jump)…Speed towards your goal (the descent)…Reach your goal (bungee at full stretch)…Then get snapped right back to where you started, because the manner in which you got there wasn’t realistic or sustainable.If you have a goal, allow yourself plenty of time to get there.Once you reach it, keeping it will be easy.#TrainSmartIf you have any question on this article or for getting atailored program to help you reach your goals, please contact me through the link below.https://www.facebook.com/pages/Rushe-Personal-Training-and-Performance/120518884715118* Emmet is the owner and operator of Rushe Personal Training and PerformanceEMMET RUSHE’S FITNESS COLUMN: FAST TRACK TO FAILURE? was last modified: May 26th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:emmet rushefastrack to failurefitness columnlast_img read more

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‘DONEGAL IS HAPPY’ VIDEO MOVES SINGER TO TEARS ON OPRAH SHOW

first_imgSinger Pharrell Williams breaks down after watching the Happy video including clips from Donegal.A short video of people just being happy in Co Donegal made singing sensation Pharrell Williams break down in tears on Oprah Winfrey’s television show Oprah Prime.The show, which is watched by more than 7 million viewers daily, featured 15 countries from around the world getting happy along to the singer’s hit song.The singer was a guest on the American’s chat show host’s TV show which aired on Sunday night last. And the Donegal clip even made Williams shed a tear!During the interview Oprah and Pharrell are watching a huge screen featuring the clips of countries from around the world getting ‘Happy.’Oprah says to Pharrell “People started putting up videos from around the world of themselves getting ‘Happy.”As the compilation rolls, dancers appear at the famous Fanad lighthouse in Donegal. And then as the McGettigan butchers, from Donegal Town, dance with strings of sausages, Oprah says to Pharrell “It is just amazing”.Amazingly Pharrell is moved to tears by the short video.Oprah also becomes emotional and says to him “it makes me cry too!”The Donegal video, one of 150 made around the world (only 15 clips appeared on Oprah), was shot over three days across the north-west last month.Cameraman Shane Wallace of Wallace media who made the video, said they have been amazed by the reaction to the video. “The reaction has been nothing short of astounding to the video.“It’s hard to believe that Donegal featured on Oprah Prime and that Pharrell Williams broke down in the middle of it.“If that’s not a good advertisement for Donegal tourism and for all the county has to offer, then I don’t know what is,” said Mr Wallace.Ends ‘DONEGAL IS HAPPY’ VIDEO MOVES SINGER TO TEARS ON OPRAH SHOW was last modified: April 15th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:DOnegal Is HappyOprahPharrell Williamslast_img read more

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Fifty years of Patrick Mynhardt

first_img5 July 2002He’s 70, he’s been an actor for 50 years, lives in a cosy house in Norwood, Johannesburg, and has no plans to retire. He’s Patrick Mynhardt, and he’s full of deprecating comments about himself, despite having achieved great success in his years in the theatre.“Retire? What would I do? I can do nothing but talk shit”, he says, with a hint of a smile.He’s recently finished his 500-page autobiography, which took him 10 years to do. “It just ‘borrelled’ out of my nostrils and ears,” he explains. He doesn’t have a publisher yet because he’s still working out how to put it all on disk – “I bought my computer in 1987, and I don’t really know how to put the pages on disk.”Patrick is usually associated with works he’s adapted from one of South Africa’s best storytellers, Herman Charles Bosman, but in fact he has played a range of roles – Cassius in Julius Caesar, Napoleon in War and Peace, Victor in Private Lives, Dr Josef Mengele in Nemesis and many others, as well as numerous roles in Afrikaans plays.Patrick Mynhardt and Oom Schalk Lourens: ‘Those stories are bloody beautiful’Despite the successes, he is somewhat madcap about his ability. “If people tell me I’m good, I think they’re mad. If they don’t, I’m hurt”, he says.Patrick, a resident of Johannesburg for 42 years, was born in the small Free State town of Bethulie in 1932 to an Afrikaner father and an Irish mother, and retains, he says, aspects of his Irish heritage. “I love the Irish and their whimsicality – I have a lot of it in me.”His Afrikaner side emerges in his storytelling abilities. He used to go around to the old folk in Bethulie and say to them: “Vertel my ‘n storie”. The storytelling engendered a love of theatre, he says.But perhaps what pushed him into the theatre was an abortive three-year university career. He started off doing a BA at Rhodes University in Grahamstown, where, in his first year, he did English, Afrikaans and chemistry. “The chemistry was a disaster, I learnt the formulae and definitions by heart.” But that didn’t help.He then changed courses, and chose law, but that turned out to be much worse than chemistry. In his third year he dropped law, and went back to the arts.He considered “self-moord”, but that didn’t work either, because he “used a Minora razor blade because it was cheaper than a Minette”, and it didn’t do the trick.By now friends suggested he become an actor, so in 1953 he moved to Pretoria with that in mind. Within a year he left for London where he spent six years learning the craft. He also learnt something about potato peeling and dish washing, as part-time jobs, treating each dish as a battleship in fantasy games to try and relieve the boredom.He says he hated reciting “Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers …” and would have preferred to have said: “Wie weet waar Willie Wouters woon, Willie Wouters woon waar westa winda waai.”But it was a productive time in England – he worked all over England and in London in two West End plays, got parts in television plays and serials for the BBC and commercial TV companies. He also had roles in films, for the Rank Organisation and MGM. He worked with many famous actors, among them Judi Dench.Back to South AfricaIn 1960 he “longed for South Africa” and decided to come back. In the sixties he played in Private Lives, War and Peace and The Staircase, amongst others, and the film Majuba. Altogether he has appeared in 150 stage plays here and in England. He has worked in other media too – 100 local and international films and around 100 television plays and serials, in South Africa and overseas.In 1968 various authors were asked to read their stories at a theatre dinner by candlelight. Patrick was invited to read a Herman Charles Bosman story. He was offered R30, a meal and the pre-condition that he hold the book and refer to it. He turned it down. But eventually he was persuaded – and read Willem Prinsloo’s Peach Brandy.Patrick went on holiday after this, but before he left he bought all Bosman’s books and read them while he was away.“He didn’t attract me at all, I don’t love him more than anyone else”, he says in one breath, but in another: “Those stories are bloody beautiful.”The one-man Bosman shows are still in demand 34 years later. He put together four shows – A Sip of Jerepigo, More Jerepigo, Just Jerepigo and Another Sip of Jerepigo – and has toured the country extensively. He took the shows to England and toured the top cities, but wasn’t sure of how successful he was there, except in Manchester, where, although “they wouldn’t let me leave the stage, they weren’t warm”.Patrick doesn’t think he’ll put together a fifth Bosman show, but if he did, he would call it Tjeerio Jerepigo.His own storyIn 1982 he was encouraged by actor Gordon Mulholland and comedian Hal Orlandini to put together a show of his life story – “Your own stories are so marvellous,” they said.And so The Boy from Bethulie was born. In it you’ll hear about his “drinking problem”. He recounts: “My mother had a big problem with me, she had to hide the drink from me, my favourite was peppermint liqueur. I had my first stomach pump before I was six.”There’s the anecdote about the five little Jewish boys, aged five to nine, who lived in Bethulie and came to his house to play after watching a war movie. Patrick had them marching and saluting to Hitler by the time their parents came to fetch them at the end of the afternoon. “They didn’t come to play for six weeks.”Or the story about having his name in lights. When he arrived to play at Ermelo in Mpumalanga, his name was underneath the name of the show: “A spi of Jerepigo”.The next move was to combine the Bosman and Mynhardt – the result was The Best of Bosman and Bethulie, which he has performed in Brussels, New York, Washington, San Francisco and Israel, as well as back home.“For 50 years I have had the rare privilege of being an actor. Even though I’ve been an actor for those years, I know nothing,” says Patrick.He has no immediate plans for the future but several regrets – he would love to do “the odd cameo for South Africans in Australia who remember the country with nostalgia”. He makes it clear he doesn’t need to do the shows for money, but for another reason: “I am a rich actor, I don’t need the money. I need the therapy.”Another regret: “I would love to be a better spiritual human being, a truly good person. I believe in a god, I would love to be a born-again Christian, but the fault is mine for not working on it.”Patrick has brought Bosman alive for thousands of people, and given those people lots to laugh about in Oom Schalk Lourens’ view of the world. He’s given even more people a great night at the theatre with his own story, The Boy from Bethulie, and his The Best of Bosman and Bethulie.He says: “I just wanted to be a wonderful actor.” Forget about regrets. If you’ve achieved your great desire in life, what else matters?Source: City of Johannesburg web site Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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Moviemaker Ian Gabriel tells South African stories

first_imgGabriel is playing his part for South Africa as one of the nation’s most prolific commercials directors, working locally and internationally in Europe, North America, Asia and the rest of Africa. His combination of storytelling and performance, with his distinctive visual style is a defining quality of his work. (Image: Ian Gabriel)• Brand South Africa +27 11 483 0122 info@brandsouthafrica.com• Cape Flats gang film an Oscar contender • Watch: Four Corners, South Africa’s Oscars contender, releases locally • South Africa: a top film location • Filming incentives grow South African movie industry • Homeland moves to Cape TownMelissa Jane Cook Earlier this year, Four Corners was selected as the South African entry for the Best Foreign Language Film for the 86th Academy Awards.The gritty, hard hitting crime thriller tells the story of a young chess prodigy who must defy the odds and stay one move ahead of the gangs in a game where losing can be the difference between life or death. It takes a hard look at the reality that many Cape Flats teenagers face daily.“Every story that you get a chance to tell is vitally important while you’re telling it. Now that the film is made, it is engaging in a conversation that started and continues every week with the news of gang wars and the involvement and sacrifice of youths in turf wars. This is particularly prevalent in the Cape Flats, but it’s also true of youth in other marginal societies in South Africa who are growing up in a culture where there’s the pervasive threat of violence,” says the film’s maker, Ian Gabriel.When making Four Corners, Gabriel wanted to make a film close to home. “I thought that was very important. Forgiveness was about family and individuals in family damaged by an act of the past. Four Corners is about family trying to get beyond the past to make a new life.”The film is set in a mixed race community, which is the origin of his family as well. “I’ve spent a fair amount of time in my past thinking about those circumstances and how that reflects in unique ways on my life and history,” he says. Watch the Four Corners trailer: Playing his partGabriel is playing his part for South Africa as one of the nation’s most prolific commercials directors, working locally and internationally in Europe, North America, Asia and the rest of Africa. His combination of storytelling and performance, with his distinctive visual style is a defining quality of his work. He is known for his visual aesthetics and sound design, as well as a relentless pursuit of excellence across all aspects of production. Gabriel, it is said, has the ability to turn every creative opportunity into an interesting visual journey.Born in 1951 in Durban, his career began at Johannesburg’s famous multi-racial theatre venue, Dorkay House. Here, a fascination with performance drew him into film, where he worked as a producer before becoming a commercials and music video director.In the 1970s and ’80s many of South Africa’s jazz and theatre greats performed at Dorkay House, among them Kippie Moeketsi, Zakes Mokae, Cyril Magubane and Janet Suzman, as well as the then younger generation of performers such as Sipho Mabuse, Thule Malgas, Victor Ntoni, John Khani and Julian Bahula. From Johannesburg, Gabriel relocated to New York City, although in time he returned to South Africa.In the 1980s, at the height of apartheid repression, he made music videos with British pop enfant terrible Malcolm MacLaren. These received a unique double silver and bronze award at the New York Film and Television Festival, putting unexpected music and dance images of Soweto on video charts around the world.Gabriel is equally at home directing off-the-cuff, slice-of-life observation as he is bringing the human touch to celebrity talent. His work with jazz greats Miriam Makeba and Abdullah Ibrahim, political icons Nelson Mandela and Desmond Tutu, football star Cristiano Ronaldo, actress Charlize Theron, world champion long distance runner Haile Gebrselassie, among others, is testament to his ability to achieve outstanding performances from actors, characters, musicians, sports heroes and political figures.He has received accolades for his television advertising work at festivals in San Sebastian, Venice, Cannes, New York, London, Milan, South Africa and Hong Kong. He currently works on developing South African-themed documentaries and feature films. “I love finding the magic in the small moments equally as much as choreographing big action, big budget visuals.”Making a start in the industry“I was working at a black theatre company in legendary Dorkay House at the bottom of Eloff Street. A photographer / filmmaker I knew wanted to make a black version of Macbeth called Maxhosa. He called me and asked for my help casting the movie as there seemed to be no one else around at that time who was considered ‘qualified’ to cast a black movie in Joburg. Once I’d cast the film I worked as third assistant director on it, but soon found myself assisting the director with the performance work,” Gabriel explains.But it was a sign of the times that he opted to go into commercials. The long-form industry was all SABC, status quo based. There was poor quality filmmaking, but there was some great commercial work being done at the same time, and ironically for those days, he says, with a great deal of freedom.Debut featureIn 2003, he completed his first feature film, Forgiveness, to acclaim on the independent festival circuit worldwide. The film received Best African and South African Film accolades; it was a Golden Leopard nominee; and Gabriel received the Youth Jury Best Director Award and was the recipient of the prestigious Human Rights Award at the 57th Locarno International Film Festival.Forgiveness received International Festival and Audience Choice Awards and has featured in programmes on conflict, drama and reconciliation at festivals around the world, as well as on programmes at Cambridge and Princeton Universities. The movie dealt with the effects of apartheid and the difficulty of reconciliation and forgiveness in post-apartheid South Africa.A storyteller“I think I’m an interpreter; I observe events and feel like I can interpret them in a particular way that reflects my particular take on things. That’s how I view performance and it’s how I view events. So I’m inspired to tell those stories where I feel I have a particular take on the behaviour, manners, motives and events,” he explains.“The inspiration, the work and the reward all live on the same holy ground that you’re meant to get to as a director – it takes focus to get there and stay in that place with the growing amount of distraction that can pull one away from the core values that one’s meant to be looking for, to do honest work as an actor or a director.”Internationally recognised as a top performance director with exceptional visual flare across all genres of filmmaking, Gabriel’s approach to filmmaking and storytelling has earned him a reputation for creating distinctive, compelling narratives. It has also turned many of his commercials into beautifully crafted short films in their own right.Local film industry“We need to figure out how best to make the industry grow so that we’ll all be proud of what the industry gives back to us and contributes to the day-to-day lifestyle of our pretty fragile South African community,” he explains. “There’s a lot of obsessing about what we can gain from this job or that choice and not much focus on how life or our industry is getting better, or what’s to be done about that. Thich Nath Hanh says: ‘no mud, no lotus’. Getting our hands dirty in practical ways to grow the lotus in our community is not a bad idea. We had the dark mud of apartheid once,” he says, referring to the Vietnamese Zen Buddhist monk and peace activist.“People who had vision, not just in politics but in our business too, recognised that mud and did something about it – that vision caused the lotus to grow in those days. We’ve got new mud these days, and only a few willing to recognise, and dip their hands in. For most it’s all a pretty blinkered celebration of the status quo, just as it was during the bad old days of ‘braaivleis, sunshine and Chevrolet’. When we recognise the mud, and start to speak up about it, we’ll get to watch the lotus of the new generation grow.”Shooting into the futureHe has a couple of adventures in the pipeline, both very different projects with strong roots in true stories. One is a project called Concealment, written by Australian Terence Hammond. It’s a police thriller about a plot to assassinate the US senator, Bobby Kennedy, in 1966. It’s a kind of Bourne Legacy/ buddy cop thriller with a controversial American true story ingredient.Gabriel is also developing a Wild West in Africa story about the roots of the Numbers Gang, called Blood Babylon. “Apart from that, I’m also keen to work on other people’s projects, and am always interested in looking at interesting material that promises strong performances. Meanwhile, I’m continuing to work in any form of authentic filmmaking that I can. It’s what I enjoy most.”last_img read more

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Heritage Cooperative, Agland Co-op announce possible merger

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest In a Wednesday press release, agricultural incorporations Heritage Cooperative and Agland Co-op said they are pleased to announce that they have entered into negotiations to consider a possible merger of the two cooperatives. The boards of directors of both cooperatives Tuesday entered into a letter of intent to work toward an agreement of merger.The release stated boards of directors of both cooperatives believe a merger provides increased opportunities to diversify risks and expand member benefits.The announcement comes on the heels of an action earlier this year by Trupointe Cooperative and Sunrise Cooperative to merge their two member-owned businesses. About HeritageHeritage Cooperative, Inc. is a member-owned cooperative founded in 2009 by the consolidation of Champaign Landmark, Inc. of Urbana and The Farmers Commission Company of Upper Sandusky. Heritage serves the agricultural needs of farmers and residents in a 20 county area in central Ohio, extending from Hardin and Wyandot counties to the North, and Pickaway and Madison counties to the South. The cooperative includes 30 locations and serves over 3,500 farmer members, and over 4,000 rural and urban customers.About AglandAgland Co-op, Inc. is based in New Philadelphia, Ohio and serves customers in Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Illinois, and Kentucky. Agland was originally established in 1933 in Canfield, Ohio and most recently merged with Green Valley Co-op in 2014. Agland has 23 locations and serves over 1,900 farmer members.last_img read more

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Juvenile among 4 arrested on charge of stripping, abusing girl in Jehanabad

first_imgPolice have arrested four youths on the charge of stripping and abusing a girl in Jehanabad district and sharing the video of the incident on social media.The police also seized the bike used by the culprits, all said to be in the age group of 16-18.“Within 24 hours of the video going viral on social media, we arrested four youths, among them one is of 16 years… we’ve also seized the bike the miscreants used in the incident but the bike owner is absconding,” Patna range Inspector General of Police Nayear Husnain Khan told The Hindu.He said that it was a heinous crime and he himself was monitoring the incident from his office. “We’ll arrest those absconding involved in the incident soon and ensure speedy trial in the case.”Victim a minorThe girl has not been identified yet but she appears to be a minor.“Soon after the video had gone viral on social media the police acted on its own and arrested four of them…we’ve also appealed that the video should not be exchanged or someone take any kind of advantage of it, otherwise action will be taken against them also”, he said.Earlier, on Saturday night a video was shared on social media in Jehanabad district of central Bihar which showed 7-8 boys stripping a girl who was crying and begging for mercy with folded hands.The youths were also using abusive and derogatory words against the girl. In the video, a youth was shown making a video of the incident on his mobile phone.Soon after the district police came to know about the video, Jehanabad Superintendent of Police Manish Kumar formed a special investigation team and launched a manhunt.“On Sunday, we identified some of the youths involved in the incident and arrested them,” said a senior police official of Jehanabad. It is suspected that the incident might have taken place in Chaura area of the district.“An FIR was lodged in the case on the basis of a written statement by a police inspector Shyam Sundar Singh,” said the police official.last_img read more

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‘Constitute shrine board for 3 temples’

first_imgThe National Green Tribunal (NGT) has directed the Uttar Pradesh government to enact a legislation and constitute a shrine board for three temples in Govardhan town of Mathura district. Further, the State government has been directed to approve the Bill in the upcoming Assembly session.Draft planTaking note of submissions made by U.P. government officials pertaining to the draft for the shrine board, a Bench headed by NGT judicial member Raghuvendra S. Rathore directed the State government to approve the same within 15 days.Further, officials informed the Tribunal that the construction of a 10.4 kilometre ring road will be completed by October 31.“In case the ring road is not completed by the said date then concerning officer shall be made accountable and appropriate order will be passed against him,” the Bench said.Solid waste problemNGO Muskan Jyoti Samiti has also been directed to ensure collection, segregation and dumping of municipal solid waste.“Mathura District Magistrate is directed to seek periodical reports and in case, any deficiency on the part of the NGO is found in doing the needful, he shall immediately issue appropriate orders for collection or disposal of municipal solid waste,” the green panel said in its order.last_img read more

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London Olympics 2012: Triple jumper Mayookha crashes out

first_imgIndia’s sole woman triple jumper in London Olympics Mayookha Johny crashed out of the Games, failing to qualify for the finals with a disappointing 13th place finish in Group B here on Friday.The Indian finished a dismal 22nd overall with a best effort of 13.77 metres, which she got in her first attempt at the Olympic Stadium.Things only got worse for her as she jumped 13.68m in the second and 13.22m in the third.Olga Rypakova of Kazakhstan had the highest jump in the qualification round with a 14.79m.Mayookha earned a last-minute qualification for the Games after an impressive showing in a German competition.last_img read more

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