Venezuelan newspapers at risk of closure says press group

first_imgRelated posts:Venezuelan cartoonist fired after sketch slamming health care Quick Venezuela facts on Election Day Opposition coalition wins control of Venezuela’s National Assembly: What that means Former Colombian, Bolivian leaders warn of looming humanitarian crisis in Venezuela Facebook Comments Read our coverage of the Summit of the Americas here MIAMI – Several Venezuelan newspapers are at risk of imminent closure, the Inter-American Press Association warned Thursday, accusing leftist President Nicolás Maduro of impeding access to newsprint and discriminating against publications critical of his government.IAPA, which represents editors and publishers from around the Americas, noted recent announcements that El Correo del Caroni, El Impulso, El Carabobeno, El Nacional and El Regional del Zulia “will stop publishing in the coming weeks.”“Once more we hold President Maduro responsible for restricting the freedom of the press and the public’s right to information, by means of a special mechanism of persecution and discrimination,” IAPA’s president Gustavo Mohme said in a statement.IAPA, which is based in Miami, charged that the Maduro government targets independent newspapers by denying them hard currency to buy newsprint or withholding government advertising.“We are in a very chaotic situation,” said Claudio Paolillo, the head of IAPA’s free press committee. “The media are closing and with them the hopes they keep alive as democratic bastions within the country.”At last week’s Summit of the Americas, IAPA criticized Latin American countries for remaining silent about the situation in Venezuela.The Maduro government in the past has dismissed IAPA’s warnings about the decline of freedom of expression in Venezuela, calling the press group “an instrument of right-wing newspapers.”Read more Venezuela coverage hereFollowing is the full text of IAPA’s statement on Thursday: IAPA alerts all governments about the imminent shutdown of newspapers in VenezuelaIt holds Nicolás Maduro responsible for deterioration in free speech, democracyMIAMI, Florida (April 16, 2015)—The Inter American Press Association (IAPA) today renewed its call to the international community concerning the deterioration of democracy and press freedom in Venezuela, a situation reflected in discriminatory actions and restrictions continuing to be imposed by the government of Nicolás Maduro against the local critical and independent press.As a follow up to an open letter addressed to government leaders during the recent 7th Summit of the Americas in Panama, in which the IAPA complained of “the compliant silence” concerning the deteriorating situation in Venezuela, IAPA President Gustavo Mohme declared, “Once more we hold President Maduro responsible for curtailing press freedom and the public’s right to information through a special mechanism of persecution and discrimination, set in place with the intent of silencing independent and critical voices.”Mohme, editor of the Lima, Peru, newspaper La República, stressed that after this denunciation and those that the IAPA has been making for years now about the deterioration of press freedom in Venezuela “no one can remain indifferent to the announcements by prestigious leading newspapers such as El Correo del Caroní, El Impulso, El Carabobeño, El Nacional and El Regional de Zulia, among others, that in the next few weeks they will cease publishing because the government is not providing them with foreign exchange to import newsprint, or they have to do so through the Alfredo Maneiro Editorial Complex, a state-run company that has a monopoly in the sale and distribution of newsprint and is used as a discriminatory weapon to punish those that maintain a journalism that is independent and true to democratic values.”There are three means of discrimination applied by the government to independent newspapers. They are not provided with foreign exchange to import supplies, they are denied access to newsprint, and they are discriminated against by denying them official advertising that provided to other media, giving rise to an unfair competition in detriment to the plurality of voices. All this, on top of the general economic situation that has caused revenue from advertising and circulation to fall to historic low levels.“They are facing an increasingly chaotic situation,” said Claudio Paolillo, chairman of the IAPA’s Committee on Freedom of the Press and Information, “the print media are closing down, along with the few hopes of their being able to continue as democratic bastions in the nation, as was always their function.”Paolillo, editor of the Montevideo, Uruguay, weekly Búsqueda, added that what is worse about “this situation is that the government, due to its explicit intent to curtail press freedom, ends up damaging the source of work of hundreds of journalists, employees and indirect workers who depend on that important source of income, thus undermining the freedom of expression of the Venezuelan people, who cannot have access to a wide range of sources of information.”The IAPA officers said that “the shutdown of newspapers in recent years during this Maduro government, and the possibility that others will be closing, is a responsibility that should weigh upon all the intergovernmental institutions and governments of our Americas, because what is at play is democracy. No one should turn its back on the Venezuelans’ plight.”The IAPA remains alert and continues to explore various ways to support the Venezuelan press.El Correo del Caroní, in Ciudad Guayana, explained in an announcement on its Web site on Monday (April 13) that for the first time in 37 years it would be circulating with a different format, due to the crisis in the provision of newsprint that the country was undergoing. It also recalled that the print edition had already been reduced to eight pages since 2014. “We are now forced to migrate to the tabloid format so as to ensure our circulation and the editorial independence that is causing official annoyance,” announced the paper, which given these circumstances will continue to develop its digital platform.Several days before this announcement the newspaper NotiDiario in Tucupita, Delta Amacuro state, announced on its front page that “today, April 7, will be the last print edition after 28 years …. Without supplies there is no newspaper, there is no work, there is no information.” According to the newspaper news will continue to be published on its Web page.Last week the Valencia newspaper El Carabobeño warned that it could stop circulation for lack of newsprint. The paper, founded 81 years ago, explained that in order to be able to extend its circulation for one more month it was considering suspending future issues of its Sunday magazine Paréntesis, which has reduced its number of pages from 48 to 32.The Barquisimeto newspaper El Impulso has also announced that it has enough newsprint for only about eight days. For the same reason in February the daily newspaper Tal Cual turned into a weekly after using up its newsprint reserves, and that December the newspaper El Guayanés stopped publishing.The Caracas daily newspaper El Nacional has enough newsprint for less than three months, and El Regional de Zulia in Ciudad Ojeda, Zulia state, confirmed that it will run out on July 15.The IAPA is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to the defense and promotion of freedom of the press and of expression in the Americas. It is made up of more than 1,300 print publications from throughout the Western Hemisphere and is based in Miami, Florida. For more information please go tohttp://www.sipiapa.org.last_img read more

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Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impa

first_img Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impact LISTEN: Dave Pasch, NFL and college football analyst “That’s the reason why how you draft in rounds 3-7 are so important. You’ve got to get players who can step in and play that first year,” Pasch said Tuesday on the Doug and Wolf show on Arizona Sports 98.7 FM . “Guys like (third-round pick) Kareem Martin and (fifth-round pick) Ed Stinson — obviously you’ve got veterans, too, like Frostee Rucker — but Stinson and Kareem Martin, it’s time for them to step up.“I also think it puts pressure on the secondary. These guys are going to be expected to do more than maybe (they were) going into the year. I know they were counting on Patrick Peterson, Tyrann Mathieu, Antonio Cromartie to take the ball away. They’re going to have to make more plays because Darnell Dockett didn’t get 10 sacks a year, but he got a few, and he made it possible for other guys to get sacks… They’ve got to manufacture sacks, and that puts more pressure on the secondary to help (make) that happen.”The Cardinals will enter the regular season without three of their front seven — Dockett, linebacker Daryl Washington (suspension) and linebacker Karlos Dansby (free agency) — that helped them finish the 2013 season as the NFL’s top rushing defense. “If you can tell me that these guys I mentioned earlier (Martin and Stinson) are going to step up and play, and play well, I think that they can weather that storm,” Pasch said.Pasch said Dockett, who missed just two games in 10 NFL seasons, will be missed as much for his leadership as his on-field performance.“I think there are players that rally behind him, players certainly that love and respect him, and so you’re losing one of your top leaders on that side of the ball,” he said.“Most NFL teams, there’s some major injury they have to overcome to get to a Super Bowl, and unfortunately for the Cardinals, you’ve got to overcome a guy who, I don’t know if he’s the heart and soul anymore of that defense, but he’s still a big part of it.”If it turns out that Dockett, who is in the final year of his contract in Arizona, has played his last game in a Cardinals uniform, Pasch said he “deserves strong Ring of Honor consideration” for a decade’s worth of reliability and productivity.“When you look at defensive tackles since he came into the league since 2004 — games played, sacks, tackles — he’s up there with the best of them. There are guys that were drafted after him at his position that are out of the league, yet this guy starts every game every year, and I want to stop, pause, and pay my respect for what this guy has done as a Cardinal.” Arizona Cardinals play-by-play broadcaster Dave Pasch said several pieces will have to fall into place in order for the Cardinals to overcome the loss of three-time Pro Bowl defensive end Darnell Dockett to a season-ending ACL injury.Pasch said the Cardinals were able to win 10 games last season despite injuries to key personnel, and they can have the same success minus Dockett this year if their 2014 draft picks at defensive end make an immediate impact and their secondary can help disrupt opposing offenses at the line of scrimmage. Comments   Share   Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo Top Stories Your browser does not support the audio element.last_img read more

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